This time is different*

Michael J Mazarr, who is a senior political scientist at the RAND Corporation and who was a professor and associate dean of academics at the U.S. National War College, and also was a special assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, near the very top of the Pentagon, has written a short … Continue reading This time is different*

A recipe for populism

I am going to deal, for a few days, with the threats that I see facing liberalism and liberal democracy and, consequently, facing Canada, too. The celebrated Scots-American author and historian Niall Ferguson, speaking in 2016, BEFORE Donald Trump was elected and when most people still believed that Hillary Clinton would be the next US … Continue reading A recipe for populism

A new poll

The (somewhat right-centre biased) Angus Reid Institute has released a new poll which shows that "for Liberal candidates, a disastrous slide in support over the first half of the year appears to have ended, making this a critical – albeit shrinking – period of time to try to regroup and rebuild ... [and] ... Conservatives, meanwhile, will … Continue reading A new poll

The Senate, again …

Following on from my recent comments about Bill-C-48, I note that Andrew Coyne, writing in the National Post, reminds us that "The business of passing, amending or defeating legislation, in a democracy, is properly the work of the people’s elected representatives, and no one else. Senators may have the power to do so, on paper, … Continue reading The Senate, again …

One problem … and another

I saw this story (in the Globe and Mail, and elsewhere) about the idea of sending former Prime Minister Jean Chétien to China to negotiate for the release of Canadian being held as, essentially, hostages by China, and, one presumes, to do what Chrystia Freeland cannot, because the Chinese Foreign Minister will not talk to Canada's … Continue reading One problem … and another