CANZUK, again.

Nigel Wright, who was Chief of Staff to Prime Minister Stephen Harper (and who resigned when it was discovered that he used his own money to repay some of Senator Mike Duffy’s misappropriated expenses) and is now the (London based) Senior Managing Director of the multi-billion dollar Onex Corporation, says, in a piece published by…… Continue reading CANZUK, again.

Something is rotten …

… in the state of Canada. (Apologies to the bard.) I see in the Globe and Mail that “The federal government is partnering with Huawei to sponsor leading-edge computer and electrical engineering research at Canadian universities, a move critics say threatens this country’s national security and economic interests … [and] … The National Sciences and…… Continue reading Something is rotten …

Short of war (4)

MANAGED STRATEGIC COMPETITION Managed Strategic Competition is, former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd opines, in a recent article in Foreign Affairs, the only way to avoid turning Cold War 2.0 into a hot war. “The deeply conflicting nature of U.S. and Chinese strategic objectives and the profoundly competitive nature of the relationship may make conflict,…… Continue reading Short of war (4)

Short of War (3)

Former Australian prime minister and noted ‘China watcher’ Kevin Rudd says, in his recent article in Foreign Affairs, that Underlying all of Xi Jinping’s strategic choices lies his belief, “reflected in official Chinese pronouncements and CCP literature, that the United States is experiencing a steady, irreversible structural decline. This belief is now grounded in a…… Continue reading Short of War (3)

Short of war (2)

Following on from yesterday with former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s suggestion for how to contain China without stating an all-out shooting war, he says that amongst Xi Jinping’s goals are: First, he wants “to remain in power until 2035, by which time he will be 82, the age at which Mao passed away. Xi’s…… Continue reading Short of war (2)

Short of war (1)

I have often cited former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s views on China. I, and many others, find him, and Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, to be both experts on China and insightful in their analyses of the Sino-American relationship. (Parenthetically, isn’t it sad that no one it their right mind would ever sight…… Continue reading Short of war (1)

The chessboard

Yesterday, I said that Canada’s foreign policy is in disarray and then I saw an article by Marie-Danielle Smith in MacLean’s magazine in which she used the analogy of the world as a chessboard and said “last we checked, Canada does have a foreign minister – quite an energetic one – in François-Philippe Champagne. With…… Continue reading The chessboard

There’s not much choice

“In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age.” former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. “In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for having…… Continue reading There’s not much choice

It’s time for Canada to step up

Just a few days ago British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said, in the House of Commons that “”We made clear that if China continued down this path we would introduce a new route for those with British National (Overseas) status to enter the UK, granting them limited leave to remain with the ability to live…… Continue reading It’s time for Canada to step up

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media’s role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail’s front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It…… Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0