BZ to Team Trudeau

Dr Adam Chapnick, who is a professor of defence studies at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) and who also serves as the deputy director of education at the Canadian Forces College in Toronto writes, in his eponymous blog, that "On July 31st, Canada achieved a significant foreign policy victory. It wasn’t flashy; it had … Continue reading BZ to Team Trudeau

A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It's a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson … Continue reading A G-something?

It boggles the mind

Despite my remarks, yesterday, or, at least as I warned in the last sentence, this is a highly partisan post, it's a bit of a rant, actually, because I see in an article by Mike Blanchfield of the Canadian Press, published on National Newswatch that Canada's man-child, trust-fund-kid, limousine-liberal prime minister, Justin Trudeau indirectly compares … Continue reading It boggles the mind

A fundamental shift?

Professor Branko Milanović, formerly lead economist in the World Bank Research Department, writes, in Foreign Affairs, that "As of March 2020, the entire world is affected by an evil with which it is incapable of dealing effectively and regarding whose duration no one can make any serious predictions. The economic repercussions of the novel coronavirus … Continue reading A fundamental shift?

Afghanistan in retrospect (3) (the Future?)

Following on from the other day, Dr Carter Malkasian writes, in Foreign Affairs, that in 2015 and 2016 the war in Afghanistan went from bad to worse for the US-supported Afghan government. That rejuvenated Taliban went from victory to victory, from strength to strength. Then, "When President Donald Trump took office in January 2017, the … Continue reading Afghanistan in retrospect (3) (the Future?)

‘Trumpism’ is on the (global) rise

Fareed Zakaria, writing in the Washington Post, says that "President Trump’s speech here at the World Economic Forum  ... [in the week 20-24 January 20202] ... went over relatively well. That’s partly because Davos is a conclave of business executives, and they like Trump’s pro-business message. But mostly, the president’s reception was a testament to … Continue reading ‘Trumpism’ is on the (global) rise

Fixing our foreign policy

Yesterday I wrote about the Alliance For Multilateralism which I believe is: Harmless, at worst; and Likely off to a shaky start because it already (see link above) includes a few (which is too many) countries which are either weak democracies or hardly democratic at all. That being said, Canada belongs in it because we … Continue reading Fixing our foreign policy

A bit of fallout from the UK election (1): Mary Ng

It seems to me that Canadians need to take a lot more interest in this lady ⇐ Mary Ng. Ms Ng is Justin Trudeau's newly minted Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade. (It's a bit of an upgrade for her, she was, previously, the Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion. Jim … Continue reading A bit of fallout from the UK election (1): Mary Ng

China has much to celebrate, but …

Today, October 1st, is the (official) 70th anniversary of the Chinese Communist victory in the great civil war (1927-1949). Cary Huang is a veteran China watcher and a journalist with the South China Morning Post. In that journal, he says that "As China marks the 70th anniversary of the founding of the communist People’s Republic on … Continue reading China has much to celebrate, but …

Alternative history (2): More on the Brexit

This post is, mostly, conjecture. I remain convinced that a hard head says that the Brexit is a mistake but I am also persuaded that Britons voted, in a slight majority, with their hearts, not their heads, and I hope they were right. Lawrence Summers, a noted economist, the former president of Harvard University and … Continue reading Alternative history (2): More on the Brexit