Is America entitled to be the leader?

Professors James Goldgeier and Bruce W Jentleson, in a provocative article in Foreign Affairs, say that despite the fact that the notion "That the United States should lead the world is often taken for granted, at least in Washington, D.C. ... [because] ... The country played that role for more than seven decades after World … Continue reading Is America entitled to be the leader?

Where are we? (4)

Matthew Fisher, who is one of Canada's (too few) journalists who writes with knowledge in insight on Defence and Foreign Policy matters, says, in an opinion piece for Global News, that "Western countries with an interest in the Far North, such as Canada, Denmark (Greenland), Norway, the United Kingdom, France and the United States, were … Continue reading Where are we? (4)

A strategy of resilience

Professor Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt University) is a moderate progressive Democrat in US terms. He has been a policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren ~ he is well to the right of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and, probably, very slightly to the left of Joe Biden. He has written a provocative article in Foreign Affairs … Continue reading A strategy of resilience

I disagree

I often cite the Globe and Mail's John Ibbitson; most often I cite him approvingly. Not today; and not tomorrow, either. Today's disagreement is with his contention that Canada will and should welcome a Democratic administration in Washington (presumptively a Biden-Harris administration). Historically Canada, as John Ibbitson says, almost never likes Democratic Party governments or … Continue reading I disagree

There’s not much choice

"In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age." former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. "In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for having … Continue reading There’s not much choice

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It's a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson … Continue reading A G-something?

A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press' Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that "Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden … Continue reading A Biden Foreign Policy

Sleeping with the elephant

It is time to return to thinking about the USA and how Canada can and should respond to what is happening there. I have been a fan of Professor Amy Chua since her first book, 'World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability' was published almost 20 years ago. … Continue reading Sleeping with the elephant

Not so surprising

Lawrence Martin, a veteran and staunchly anti-conservative columnist for the Globe and Mail writes, in that newspaper, that "Just when we thought all was going to rot in the land of the distraught, good things happen. The Supreme Court of the United States comes to the rescue, issuing two humanitarian verdicts in the space of … Continue reading Not so surprising