World’s worst nightmare

"The democratic world’s worst nightmare," Terry Glavin, writing in the Ottawa Citizen asserts, "is not an American election day victory for Trump’s Republicans, which would be catastrophic enough. It’s the prospect of Trump losing but refusing to relinquish power on the pretext of a purportedly illegitimate vote result. It is no longer far-fetched to imagine … Continue reading World’s worst nightmare

Those fabulous fifties?

Anyone else remember the 1950s? Norman Spector, a former federal and provincial public servant, who served at the very highest levels of government, diplomat (Ambassador to Israel), corporate "communications" (public relations) guru and author, remembers: And so do I. But I don't just remember high school dances and young love, because the 1950s were a … Continue reading Those fabulous fifties?

Is America entitled to be the leader?

Professors James Goldgeier and Bruce W Jentleson, in a provocative article in Foreign Affairs, say that despite the fact that the notion "That the United States should lead the world is often taken for granted, at least in Washington, D.C. ... [because] ... The country played that role for more than seven decades after World … Continue reading Is America entitled to be the leader?

A strategy of resilience

Professor Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt University) is a moderate progressive Democrat in US terms. He has been a policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren ~ he is well to the right of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and, probably, very slightly to the left of Joe Biden. He has written a provocative article in Foreign Affairs … Continue reading A strategy of resilience

I disagree

I often cite the Globe and Mail's John Ibbitson; most often I cite him approvingly. Not today; and not tomorrow, either. Today's disagreement is with his contention that Canada will and should welcome a Democratic administration in Washington (presumptively a Biden-Harris administration). Historically Canada, as John Ibbitson says, almost never likes Democratic Party governments or … Continue reading I disagree

There’s not much choice

"In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age." former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. "In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for having … Continue reading There’s not much choice

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press' Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that "Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden … Continue reading A Biden Foreign Policy

How to win Cold War 2.0

Robert M Gates, who was both the United States' Director of Central Intelligence (1991-93 under President George HW Bush) and Secretary of Defence for both Presidents George W Bush and Barack Obama (2006-2011), writes in Foreign Affairs, that "Even before the virus struck, there was broad bipartisan agreement that Washington should reduce its commitments abroad … Continue reading How to win Cold War 2.0