A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press' Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that "Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden … Continue reading A Biden Foreign Policy

How to win Cold War 2.0

Robert M Gates, who was both the United States' Director of Central Intelligence (1991-93 under President George HW Bush) and Secretary of Defence for both Presidents George W Bush and Barack Obama (2006-2011), writes in Foreign Affairs, that "Even before the virus struck, there was broad bipartisan agreement that Washington should reduce its commitments abroad … Continue reading How to win Cold War 2.0

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

Why does this not surprise me?

This article in the National Post just caused me (and many of my friends and former colleagues with, in total, centuries of experience in National Defence Headquarters)  to shrug. You might have looked for at least an eye-roll, but, no, all it rated was a shrug. What didn't surprise anyone? Well, according to the Canadian … Continue reading Why does this not surprise me?

Not so fast

The Economist, looking forward to the US November elections, says "Four months ago, Donald Trump’s odds of winning a second term had never looked better. After an easy acquittal in his impeachment trial, his approval rating had reached its highest level in three years, and was approaching the upper-40s range that delivered re-election to George W. … Continue reading Not so fast

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

Justin Trudeau does the right thing

I see, on BNN Bloomberg, that "Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has rejected Donald Trump's latest proposal to readmit Russia to the G7, stoking old divisions between the American president and the rest of the group ... [and] ... Trump was to host the G7 summit later this month but postponed it to the fall because of … Continue reading Justin Trudeau does the right thing

Just when I think …

Just when I begin to think that President Donald J Trump could not get any worse, he goes and surprises me again. Just a day or two ago, I saw, in Breaking Defense, that "President Donald Trump delivered a garbled and misleading critique of the F-35’s supply chain today, casting the flexible and redundant international supply … Continue reading Just when I think …

What’s a Trillion?

There is a rather embarrassing (for Liberal partisans) video floating around the Internet. It shows Finance Minister Bill Morneau doing his very best to avoid answering some fairly simple and straight forward questions put to him in the House of Commons, during a session of the Special Committee on the COVID-19 Pandemic, by Conservative pit … Continue reading What’s a Trillion?

Justin Trudeau should listen

I see, in the Globe and Mail, that there is yet another case of Canadians being imprisoned in China on (most likely) trumped-up charges. The Globe and Mail says that "Peter Wang and Ruqin Zhao are Chinese-born engineers who worked in the Toronto area, described by a former manager as immigrants who sought a better … Continue reading Justin Trudeau should listen