Fixing our foreign policy

Yesterday I wrote about the Alliance For Multilateralism which I believe is: Harmless, at worst; and Likely off to a shaky start because it already (see link above) includes a few (which is too many) countries which are either weak democracies or hardly democratic at all. That being said, Canada belongs in it because we … Continue reading Fixing our foreign policy

We need to do better

Shelly Hagan, Bloomberg's Ottawa based Canadian economics reporter, says, in a recent (7 Jan 20) article, that "Economists expect Canada and the U.S. to compete for the top spot for growth among the Group of Seven countries in 2020, yet the latest population data reveal the two nations have starkly different forces driving their expansions." … Continue reading We need to do better

So, here we are …

... not even ten days into the 2020s. A century ago the "roaring '20s" dawned with the realization that the Treaty Of Versailles (28 June 1919) was so deeply flawed that Henry Cabot Lodge, a great and astute American statesman, who had advocated for American participation, on the allied side, in the First World War … Continue reading So, here we are …

Where are we? (5)

Normally when I ask "where are we?" I am referring to our lack of military capability in our vast Arctic regions. This time it's an economic question. Here are two very similar charts: Both measure roughly the same thing: the world's most competitive economies in 2019. The chart on the left is from the highly … Continue reading Where are we? (5)

Afghanistan in (1st draft) retrospect

It's far, far too soon to write the history of the war in Afghanistan. In that regard, I'm reminded of the anecdote about the first meeting of Henry Kissinger and Zhou Enlai in the run-up to the historic Nixon visit to China. Dr Kissinger, knowing that Zhou Enlai was interested in history, is reputed to … Continue reading Afghanistan in (1st draft) retrospect

The Trump Effect (5)

As I predicted late last month, President Trump did, indeed, chastise Canada and others for being "delinquent" in meeting their (specifically NATO) defence burden-sharing promises. How he will punish the "delinquents" remains to be seen, but we might get a hint from how he is, currently, treating Japan. The Financial Times discusses the president's transactional … Continue reading The Trump Effect (5)

Some fallout from the UK election (3): Unity

Timothy Garton Ash,  who is Professor of European Studies at Oxford, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, writing in the Guardian, lamenting that the 'Remain' forces have, finally, lost the Brexit battle, notes that "Under Johnson’s EU withdrawal deal, Northern Ireland will … Continue reading Some fallout from the UK election (3): Unity