What the CPC didn’t do (3)

In an essay in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson dissects the recent election and, not surprisingly, concludes that the Conservative party may have been its own worst enemy. He focuses on three key issues: Climate change ~ and he quotes the estimable Lisa Raitt who said that “"It’s a litmus test ... Climate change … Continue reading What the CPC didn’t do (3)

Almost four years ago (2)

Following on from a couple of days ago ... Almost four years ago I said that: The next Conservative leader should have been like a long-dead Liberal ~ I was, as regular readers will know, speaking about Louis St Laurent who, if he was alive today would not, I am certain, recognize the modern Liberal … Continue reading Almost four years ago (2)

A bit of a farce

David Rosenberg, who is the chief economist at Gluskin Sheff + Associates, says, in an opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, that "It is hard to believe, based on the country’s economic record of the past four years, that Canadians opted for four more years of centre-left policies. At the margin, with the NDP … Continue reading A bit of a farce

What the CPC didn’t do

Back in the summer of 2016, I said (speaking as a Conservative partisan) that: "Our task in 2019 is far less daunting than the one the Liberals faced in 2013, 14 and 15. We need to convince ‘only’ about 1,000,000 voters to switch from Liberal to Conservative. Some of them, actually many of them, have voted for us in … Continue reading What the CPC didn’t do

One set of rules …

This story, on CBC News, caught my eye. It explains that "According to Toronto's 'Use of City Resources During an Election Period Policy,' city facilities and infrastructure can't be used for any election-related purpose by a candidate, registered third-party advertiser or political party. It also prohibits signs from being "erected or displayed" on or beside a … Continue reading One set of rules …

It’s still nonsense

The Globe and Mail says, yet again, in an editorial, that "it’s time to look at banning these sorts of guns, which are increasingly employed in violent crime in Canada’s cities, and increasingly involved in homicides ... [and] ... These firearms are small, portable and easily concealed. They’re also relatively inaccurate, and have few legal uses. They’re … Continue reading It’s still nonsense