Warming up Cold War 2.0

The New York Times News Service, in a report published in the Globe and Mail, reports that "The Trump administration is pushing the sale of seven large packages of weapons to Taiwan, including long-range missiles that would allow Taiwanese jets to hit distant Chinese targets in the event of a conflict, say officials familiar with … Continue reading Warming up Cold War 2.0

Cold War 2.0: Stepping up the pressure

I see, in an article in the Hong Kong Press Press, that the US is stepping up the pressure on Beijing by reasserting its security guarantees to Taiwan. Now, I need to make my (longstanding) position clear. Taiwan is part of China. It is Chinese by geography, by ethnicity and by political will. But the … Continue reading Cold War 2.0: Stepping up the pressure

There’s not much choice

"In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age." former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. "In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for having … Continue reading There’s not much choice

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

Failure after failure after failure after …

... well, you get the picture. Justin Trudeau came into office in 2015 proclaiming that Canada is Back! Of course, as recent events have shown, nothing could be further from the truth. By almost every measure Canada has fallen in wealth, power and international stature since Justin Trudeau replaced Stephen Harper at the head of … Continue reading Failure after failure after failure after …

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting

China is a bully

"China is a bully," says Scottish journalist Stephen Daisley, writing in The Spectator, and "the sooner the West understands that, the sooner we can begin to push back." I think that much, even most of the West does understand that. The evidence has been mounting for years, starting with China's push into the contested waters … Continue reading China is a bully

Standing up …

OK, a couple of days ago I said, "Prime Minister Justin. Trudeau should listen to former Prime Minister Turnbull, to his own national security and military advisors and to his allies who advise standing up to China." How? Well, for a start ban Huawei from Canada's 5G network. Don't do it on technical grounds. Do … Continue reading Standing up …

Is India the answer?

There is an interesting opinion piece, by Vijay Sappini, in the Toronto Sun in which the author suggests that "As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads over the world, governments are struggling to grapple with the scale of the crisis and to get ahead of it when and where possible ... [and] ... A direct consequence of the crisis has been … Continue reading Is India the answer?