Can the liberal-internationalist order be saved?

Welcome to 2021! I hope all my readers had a happy and safe New Year celebration. I have commented, since this blog began, about liberalism, itself, and, just days ago, my fears for it in Justin Trudeau’s Canada. That brings me to an article, by the renowned American political scientist Walter Russell Mead in ForeignContinue reading “Can the liberal-internationalist order be saved?”

Cold War 2.0 (Biden)

Like it or not we have Cold War 2.0 and few things will matter more in the fist half of the 2020s than how President-elect Joe Biden manages the US-led West’s relationship with (against) China. The Economist, in its recent “lead” article says that “The achievement of the Trump administration was to recognise the authoritarian threatContinue reading “Cold War 2.0 (Biden)”

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media’s role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail‘s front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. ItContinue reading “A new front in Cold War 2.0”

A crisis of governance

I have been arguing for some time that liberalism, and with it democracy, are under stress. I see the stressors coming from two directions: From autocrats like Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping; and From populists ~ Donald J Trump being their frontman. But Thomas Carothers of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, writing in ForeignContinue reading “A crisis of governance”

‘Trumpism’ is on the (global) rise

Fareed Zakaria, writing in the Washington Post, says that “President Trump’s speech here at the World Economic Forum  … [in the week 20-24 January 20202] … went over relatively well. That’s partly because Davos is a conclave of business executives, and they like Trump’s pro-business message. But mostly, the president’s reception was a testament toContinue reading “‘Trumpism’ is on the (global) rise”

How to help Hong Kong

Kurt Tong is an American diplomat ~ he was the former US Consul General in Hong Kong from 2016 to 2019 ~ and businessman. He has, just recently, written an excellent article in Foreign Affairs in which he lays out what the US (and others) can and cannot do to help preserve Hong Kong’s (limited)Continue reading “How to help Hong Kong”

Canada’s lack of a Foreign Policy

Zi-Ann Lum, writing in the Huffington Post, quotes former Canadian Security Intelligence Service chief (and also former Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet and National Security Advisor to the Prime Minister and Deputy Minister of National Defence) Dick Fadden who said that “recent Conservative and Liberal governments have “failed abominably” on foreign policy work with China.”Continue reading “Canada’s lack of a Foreign Policy”

Arrant bloody nonsense

I see, on the CP24 News website, that Canada’s Defence Minister Harjot Sajjan said, at the Halifax International Security Forum, that ““We don’t consider China as an adversary” …[and he added] … “We do have two Canadians that have been arbitrarily detained in China and we ask China for their expeditious release and that’s extremelyContinue reading “Arrant bloody nonsense”

I really don’t understand …

… what Xi Jinping and the small handful of men and women who surround him are thinking. I cannot make any strategic sense out of their handling of the Hong Kong situation. It seems to me, and I would be very grateful if someone would tell me why and how I am wrong, that aContinue reading “I really don’t understand …”

Middle power?

Professor Roland Paris, of the University of Ottawa, who was formerly the foreign policy advisor to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and who has written a lot about Canada in the world, was interviewed, recently, on Australia’s ABC Radio. It’s a nearly one-hour-long piece, Professor Paris is on for about 10 minutes, at the beginning, andContinue reading “Middle power?”