I disagree …

… with Michael Barrett and Pierre Poilievre when they propose to create a new parliamentary committee to investigate the WE Charity scandal. I agree that the scandal needs a thorough investigation. I would prefer a public, judicial inquiry, but that will not happen until we have a Conservative majority government. Any new committee will just beContinue reading “I disagree …”

Absolutely!

John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says “The House of Commons is scheduled to return Monday. Obviously, all 338 MPs must not convene. But the time has come for regular sittings of the House, either real or virtual. Despite the COVID-19 emergency – no, because of it – we need the return ofContinue reading “Absolutely!”

A risk worth taking

I see, in the Globe and Mail, that “China’s new envoy to Canada warned that Beijing will launch tough countermeasures against Canada should Parliament act on a planned Senate motion calling for sanctions against Chinese leaders.” This seems to be the normal reaction for Ambassador Cong Peiwu who is a career diplomat who has specializedContinue reading “A risk worth taking”

Can increased immigration help to reform democracy in Canada?

A few days ago one of my interlocutors asked, in response to one of my posts: “Is it realistic to dispute that under the current ‘first past the post’ electoral system in Canada the country is governed / controlled by the population centre in the ‘Windsor to Quebec City’ corridor? Even today the current minorityContinue reading “Can increased immigration help to reform democracy in Canada?”

More on the Senate

I am returning to the subject of the Senate, after only a few days, because of a column that John Ibitson wrote for the Globe and Mail about two weeks ago. He said, and I agree, that, “For most of Canada’s history, the Senate has been an embarrassment, viewed by the public as an unelectedContinue reading “More on the Senate”

The Senate, again …

Following on from my recent comments about Bill-C-48, I note that Andrew Coyne, writing in the National Post, reminds us that “The business of passing, amending or defeating legislation, in a democracy, is properly the work of the people’s elected representatives, and no one else. Senators may have the power to do so, on paper,Continue reading “The Senate, again …”

I am conflicted

A few months ago I suggested that the then Justice Minister, Jody Wilson-Raybould, should step up, in the case of Vice Admiral Mark Norman, and defend the principle of cabinet government, which, as Professor Philippe Lagassé of Carleton University, who is an expert on our parliamentary system, explains is a powerful “constitutional convention of collective ministerialContinue reading “I am conflicted”

Just a thought, to start 2019: Senate reform (a hardy Canadian perennial)

I have nothing but the greatest respect for Senator Peter Harder, the Trudeau-Liberal government’s representative in the Senate, he has served Canada well as a diplomat, senior civil servant, scholar and, now, as a Senator. But he is talking nonsense when he says, according to a report on CBC News, that “the election of ConservativeContinue reading “Just a thought, to start 2019: Senate reform (a hardy Canadian perennial)”

Annoying China

This is the second of two article about China, today, and this one is very specifically about Sino-Canadian relations. The South China Morning Post reports that “A motion [in the Senate of Canada moved by Conservative Senator Thanh Hai Ngo] against Chinese military actions in the disputed South China Sea has been slammed by China,Continue reading “Annoying China”

The next GG

In an article in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson, very rightly, pays tribute to David and Sharon Johnston ~ they have, indeed, been gracious and stalwart vice-regal couple. Mr Ibbitson concludes by asking “Who will replace him? The choice of governor-general,” he explains “is a closely guarded secret that, to this writer’s knowledge, hasContinue reading “The next GG”