Biden’s new world order?

As we get ready for what I assume will be an orderly transition, in January, to a Biden administration, assuming, as I do, that all the court challenges will have failed, it is instructive to look back to the Spring of this year when President-elect Biden wrote an essay for Foreign Affairs in which heContinue reading “Biden’s new world order?”

Relationships

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, whose insights into China have caused me to comment before, writes, in an article in Foreign Affairs, that  “despite the best efforts of ideological warriors in Beijing and Washington, the uncomfortable truth is that China and the United States are both likely to emerge from this [global pandemic] crisisContinue reading “Relationships”

No one is safe until we are all safe

The Nigerian political leader and economist Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala makes the excellent point in an article in Foreign Affairs, that “It is now abundantly clear that the world cannot fully emerge from its current state of novel coronavirus lockdown until a vaccine is found. Never before have so many lives, livelihoods, and economies depended so muchContinue reading “No one is safe until we are all safe”

This is so wrong

I see, in a CTV News story, that: “With the price of Canadian crude at or near historic lows, Irving Oil has plans to tap into that supply for the Saint John refinery, but some eyebrows have been raised over how they plan to bring the crude to New Brunswick …[because, while] … For years, railContinue reading “This is so wrong”

A fundamental shift?

Professor Branko Milanović, formerly lead economist in the World Bank Research Department, writes, in Foreign Affairs, that “As of March 2020, the entire world is affected by an evil with which it is incapable of dealing effectively and regarding whose duration no one can make any serious predictions. The economic repercussions of the novel coronavirusContinue reading “A fundamental shift?”

Trudeau’s best hope

John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, warns that “Financial crises can benefit a party in government, if voters decide the leader is capable and committed … [as they did, he says, with only Jean Chrétien and Stephen Harper over the last 65 years] … More often, they’re a political disaster … [and, heContinue reading “Trudeau’s best hope”

Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)

A few weeks ago I commented on the long (2001 to 2014) Afghanistan campaign … one hesitates to call it a war; the Canadian Forces were, pretty clearly, at war; Canada was, equally clearly, not. It was Canada’s largest and most costly, in both blood and treasure, military operation since Korea (1950 to 1953) butContinue reading “Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)”

Another Trudeau train wreck?

A year ago, I commented on a train wreck in Saskatchewan that spilt 1.5 million litres of crude oil on to Saskatchewan’s farmlands. Now I see, on CBC News, that another train has crashed, just hours ago, in the same area … … about 100 km South-East of Saskatoon; and from the looks of theContinue reading “Another Trudeau train wreck?”

The Trump Peace Plan

On the subject of the Trump Mideast Peace Plan, I agree with both The Economist which says, “as a blueprint for a two-state solution it was dead on arrival,” and with the Globe and Mail‘s Mark MacKinnon who writes that “President Donald Trump’s Middle East peace plan … aims to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict almostContinue reading “The Trump Peace Plan”

The Alliance for Multilateralism (AKA the committee to save the world)

A bit more than a year ago I discussed a proposal for a G-9 which was dubbed ‘The Committee to Save the World Order.’ Sometime later, I discussed how such a group, I called it a G-X, might displace the G-20. Now, I see that last September, France and Germany formed just such a group:Continue reading “The Alliance for Multilateralism (AKA the committee to save the world)”