What are we for?

Todd Purdom, who is an editor and political correspondent for Vanity Fair, reminded us, a dozen years ago, that the Rogers and Hammerstein musical 'South Pacific' had, then, some lessons for us. He reminded us, specifically, of the scene in which the American officers are trying to persuade the civilian planter, Emile De Becque to … Continue reading What are we for?

Its time to put liberalism back in the Liberal Party of Canada

I self-identify as a classical liberal: please take a quick look at my site's (longish) title just above. Liberals like me look back past the Glorious Revolution of 1688,  past Simon de Montfort's Great Parliament in 1265, even past Aristotle and Plato, the origins of liberalism might go all the way back to the original … Continue reading Its time to put liberalism back in the Liberal Party of Canada

How to lose the next election

Jonathan Kay, an excellent journalist and commentator, posted this on social media a couple of days ago: This is the full image: That is, I think, what we are watching the Democratic Party do in the United States this year. It is why I continue, quite confidently, to predict that Donald J Trump will be … Continue reading How to lose the next election

Making Conservatism work

Andrew Coyne, writing in the Globe and Mail a few days ago, after covering ground that I have covered, over and over again, said that: "The first and most important step, then, is for Conservatives to develop some elemental self-confidence; to accept that they are in the persuasion game, and that the answer to electoral … Continue reading Making Conservatism work

What the CPC didn’t do (3)

In an essay in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson dissects the recent election and, not surprisingly, concludes that the Conservative party may have been its own worst enemy. He focuses on three key issues: Climate change ~ and he quotes the estimable Lisa Raitt who said that “"It’s a litmus test ... Climate change … Continue reading What the CPC didn’t do (3)

Cleavage politics is everybody’s loss

John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, about a week ago, suggests that the "ballot question" for October 2019 is shaping up to be: Which of these two guys do I dislike or mistrust more than the other? He says that "The end of the Labour Day long weekend – when people reluctantly bid … Continue reading Cleavage politics is everybody’s loss

I was not going to address this issue …

... even though I found Ralph Goodale's attack on Andrew Scheer for his (2005) remarks about gay marriage to be hypocritical in the extreme, given that Mr Goodale, too, voted against legalizing gay marriage at that time, and even though I cited a newer and, in my opinion, more damaging comment by Justin Trudeau, I … Continue reading I was not going to address this issue …