A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting

Justin Trudeau should listen

I see, in the Globe and Mail, that there is yet another case of Canadians being imprisoned in China on (most likely) trumped-up charges. The Globe and Mail says that "Peter Wang and Ruqin Zhao are Chinese-born engineers who worked in the Toronto area, described by a former manager as immigrants who sought a better … Continue reading Justin Trudeau should listen

I wonder if anyone is listening

Michelle Carbert, writing in the Globe and Mail, says that "Canada’s top general [General Jonathan Vance, ⇐ the Chief of the Defence Staff] says Russia poses the most immediate military threat to this country and the international community today, while China represents a significant risk for cyber attacks ... [and, the point was echoed by … Continue reading I wonder if anyone is listening

Not as bad as it looks

Murray Brewster, writing for CBC News, says that "The federal government has spent slightly more than $1.01 billion over the last seven years on design and preparatory contracts for the navy's new frigates and supply ships — and the projects still haven't bought anything that floats ... [and he adds] ... It's an enormous amount of … Continue reading Not as bad as it looks

Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)

A few weeks ago I commented on the long (2001 to 2014) Afghanistan campaign ... one hesitates to call it a war; the Canadian Forces were, pretty clearly, at war; Canada was, equally clearly, not. It was Canada's largest and most costly, in both blood and treasure, military operation since Korea (1950 to 1953) but … Continue reading Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)

Resetting our foreign policy

It is no secret, I think, to anyone who follows this blog that I regard Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's white paper on foreign policy, 'A Foreign Policy for Canadians,' as having been an act of policy vandalism. I continue to believe that Pierre Trudeau was driven by an intense need to find a way to … Continue reading Resetting our foreign policy

But that may prove impossible.

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, suggests that Justin Trudeau might want to try what former diplomat, national strategic planner in the Privy Council Office,  and commentator David Mulroney refers to (on social media) as... ... "the "Ostrich" school of Canadian foreign policy."  It has, he says,  two pillars: First, "Canada has no … Continue reading But that may prove impossible.

A risk worth taking

I see, in the Globe and Mail, that "China’s new envoy to Canada warned that Beijing will launch tough countermeasures against Canada should Parliament act on a planned Senate motion calling for sanctions against Chinese leaders." This seems to be the normal reaction for Ambassador Cong Peiwu who is a career diplomat who has specialized … Continue reading A risk worth taking

Make China Great Again?

Yesterday, I asked: "Why" is China drifting away from Deng Xiaoping's vision and back, it seems to me, towards Maoism. In an opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, award-winning author and scholar Professor Julia Lovell of the University of London draws an interesting parallel with Donald Trump. Xi Jinping, she suggests, at "The plenum resolution … Continue reading Make China Great Again?