What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Journalist and sometimes politician Stephen Taylor, writing in the National Post, says, and I agree with him, fully, that "The existence of the Wexit movement is a national tragedy ... [because] ... The Wexit movement is the latest uproar of Canadian regional populism. Canada’s bifurcation of haves and have-nots, contented and aggrieved, elites and non-elites … Continue reading What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King's College, which is one of Canada's oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada's foreign policy for the CBC's Opinion section. They look … Continue reading Three Ps

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

One old person’s thoughts about caring for old people

I'm not shocked at what military medics found in some long term care facilities. Saddened, but not shocked. Anecdote: I was in a conversation, a few years ago, about PTSD. One fellow said something that stuck with me. 'It wasn't,' he said, 'the fighting or the killing that got to me. My training prepared me … Continue reading One old person’s thoughts about caring for old people

And this, too …

David Mulroney, a former very senior official who was, during a career and included many important posts, Canada's Ambassador to China said this on social media: The "this" to which he was referring was the latest scandal to engulf the Liberals, in this case, according to the Globe and Mail, Joyce Murray, the Trudeau minister … Continue reading And this, too …

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting

It boggles the mind

Despite my remarks, yesterday, or, at least as I warned in the last sentence, this is a highly partisan post, it's a bit of a rant, actually, because I see in an article by Mike Blanchfield of the Canadian Press, published on National Newswatch that Canada's man-child, trust-fund-kid, limousine-liberal prime minister, Justin Trudeau indirectly compares … Continue reading It boggles the mind

The right thing to do?

John Ibbitson, who is described as "a writer-at-large" for the Globe and Mail (I think that means senior columnist who is given carte balance on topics) and David Parkinson, who is the Good Grey Globe's economics columnist have, in an opinion piece, opened the pandora's box of a universal basic income. Bravo! And medals for … Continue reading The right thing to do?

Follow the money

The CBC quotes the very credible C.D. Howe Institute saying: "Canada is officially in a recession that's been caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the C.D. Howe Institute's Business Cycle Council declared Friday ... [because] ... The council, which monitors recessions and recoveries in Canada, said the economy peaked in February, just before drastic measures to slow … Continue reading Follow the money