A recipe for populism

I am going to deal, for a few days, with the threats that I see facing liberalism and liberal democracy and, consequently, facing Canada, too. The celebrated Scots-American author and historian Niall Ferguson, speaking in 2016, BEFORE Donald Trump was elected and when most people still believed that Hillary Clinton would be the next US … Continue reading A recipe for populism

A tale of two graphs

So, Adam Vaughan, a Liberal MP from Toronto, posted this on social media: It's petty standard Liberal fare and I'll bet that more than half, more likely ⅔ or even ¾ of Canadians believe it. In response, Richard Groves, who is an accountant from Kelowna BC, posted this: The GFC to which Mr Groves refers … Continue reading A tale of two graphs

Civil War (2)

A few days ago I gave a brief history of the civil war which has bedevilled the Liberal Party of Canada for 50 years, since about 1969. It seems that it rages anew ... as I suspected it might, given the fast-fading fortunes of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Chantal Hébert , writing in The Star, … Continue reading Civil War (2)

In a nutshell

Professor Elinor Sloan of Carleton University, whose work I have cited a few times in this blog, writes in the Globe and Mail, that the current tempest-in-a-teapot over industrial trade benefits (ITB) rules which may (or may not) make the F-35 unavailable to Canada, matter "because of the growing competition between the major powers. Russian … Continue reading In a nutshell

Civil war

A successful political party, the famous British Conservative, Quintin Hogg, Lord Hailsham, said needs two things to prosper politically: A sense of conviction; and A sense of direction. It seems to me that the Liberal Party of Canada has been lacking one or the other or, sometimes, both since the mid-1960s. The problem, I believe, … Continue reading Civil war

The Constitution

There is, from about two weeks ago, a very interesting article, in the Globe and Mail, by Professor Richard Albert who is the William Stamps Farish Professor of Law at the University of Texas at Austin, a former law clerk for chief justice Beverley McLachlin, and the author of Constitutional Amendments: Making, Breaking, and Changing Constitutions. Professor … Continue reading The Constitution

A good question

David Krayden, who is a former Royal Canadian Air Force public affairs officer and legislative assistant on Parliament Hill, and who is, currently, the Ottawa bureau chief for The Daily Caller, a Washington-based media outlet, writing in the National Post, about the most recent Liberal budget reminds us that we "might recall the fanfare when … Continue reading A good question