I have a dream …

I mentioned, a couple of months ago, my hopes, for the Conservative Party under Erin O'Toole's leadership. Now, borrowing a famous phrase from a great man: I have a dream ... I have a dream that one day, soon, this nation will come to its senses and that the people in the suburbs around Halifax, … Continue reading I have a dream …

Canada deserves better than the Trudeaus, père et fils

"What exactly has happened to Justin Trudeau?" Charlie Mitchell ask in an article in The Independent. "In 2015, after a decade of steely Conservative rule, the scion of the powerful Trudeau family offered Canadians “sunny ways” and was rewarded with a handsome majority. Feminist, climate-conscious and outwardly pro-refugee, the 43-year-old was a hit among progressives worldwide ... [but, today, just … Continue reading Canada deserves better than the Trudeaus, père et fils

Another warning

John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail a couple of days ago, said: "Last week’s Throne Speech mentioned Alberta once, when Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government promised to help the province’s workers adjust “to meet a net zero future” of carbon emissions. That document could be remembered in history as one of the many acts … Continue reading Another warning

Sorry, but we Canadians are …

The Globe and Mail, in an editorial, says that " This space ... [editorial speak for the the views of the Globe and Mail's publisher and editors] ... has long argued that fighting the pandemic has to be “Job No. 1” for all levels of government. Keeping the number of infections from exploding is surely the way … Continue reading Sorry, but we Canadians are …

A strategy of resilience

Professor Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt University) is a moderate progressive Democrat in US terms. He has been a policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren ~ he is well to the right of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and, probably, very slightly to the left of Joe Biden. He has written a provocative article in Foreign Affairs … Continue reading A strategy of resilience

What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Journalist and sometimes politician Stephen Taylor, writing in the National Post, says, and I agree with him, fully, that "The existence of the Wexit movement is a national tragedy ... [because] ... The Wexit movement is the latest uproar of Canadian regional populism. Canada’s bifurcation of haves and have-nots, contented and aggrieved, elites and non-elites … Continue reading What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King's College, which is one of Canada's oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada's foreign policy for the CBC's Opinion section. They look … Continue reading Three Ps

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

One old person’s thoughts about caring for old people

I'm not shocked at what military medics found in some long term care facilities. Saddened, but not shocked. Anecdote: I was in a conversation, a few years ago, about PTSD. One fellow said something that stuck with me. 'It wasn't,' he said, 'the fighting or the killing that got to me. My training prepared me … Continue reading One old person’s thoughts about caring for old people