Is the worst over?

European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde is a very smart person and, on Friday, according to a report by Reuters, she said that Europe "is “probably past” the worst of the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic, but the recovery will be uneven ... [and] ... Speaking as fears of a second wave shook investors … Continue reading Is the worst over?

Democracy is in peril

About 1,500 years ago, in Saxon England, the nobles of the realm, the bishops, abbots (and abbesses) and the ealdormen and thegns and others would gather, fairly regularly, in an assembly to advise and, sometimes, to constrain the king. In a very typically English manner, they hit upon the notion that the kings were not, … Continue reading Democracy is in peril

Reviving democracy

Lorrie Goldstein, a veteran Toronto Sun journalist and a constant critic of Justin Trudeau's inept management of government, was, I hope, only trying to stir up a little controversy when he said, just the other day, on social media:   My hope is that he was trying, indirectly, to remind us that we, Canadians, and … Continue reading Reviving democracy

And this, too …

David Mulroney, a former very senior official who was, during a career and included many important posts, Canada's Ambassador to China said this on social media: The "this" to which he was referring was the latest scandal to engulf the Liberals, in this case, according to the Globe and Mail, Joyce Murray, the Trudeau minister … Continue reading And this, too …

Only the terminally stupid

Andrew Coyne is exactly right in this clip, at about 2'15", from 'The National's' 'At Issue' panel, when he says that the government is spending tens of billions of dollars and no one is holding them to account. The COVID-19 pandemic is meaningless, low rent trivia. In June of 1215, that's just over eight hundred … Continue reading Only the terminally stupid

Parliament must work

John Ibbitson reported, in the Globe and Mail, that "The House of Commons unanimously approved wage-subsidy legislation, Saturday afternoon, while Conservatives and Liberals disputed when and how Parliament should meet again ... [and] ... A smattering of MPs — only 20 are required for quorum — met briefly to approve the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy ... … Continue reading Parliament must work

Parliament worked for us

There's a good article, by Neil Moss and Peter Mazereeuw in the Hill Times in which they quote Canadian parliamentary government expert, Professor Philippe Lagassé of Carleton University who says that "despite the crisis, there still remains a place for Parliamentarians to scrutinize the government ... [and] ... the role of Parliament is laid out … Continue reading Parliament worked for us

What?

The Post Millennial, which is usually a fairly reliable (albeit somewhat breathless) source of hard news says, quoting Blacklock's Reporter, which I have found to be also pretty fair and accurate, that "Justin Trudeau's Department of Infrastructure, which is headed by the ever-controversial Catherine McKenna, cannot account for billions of taxpayer money." The report explains … Continue reading What?

Winning without Québec

Éric Grenier, who founded the poll aggregation site threehndredeight.com, and who is now a senior writer and polling analyst for the CBC, takes a look at Conservative fortunes in Québec since confederation. His analysis is, mostly, sound but he forgets one important historical point: the North-West Rebellion (1885). I believe that the French Canadian elites … Continue reading Winning without Québec

Does Megxit beget Rexit?

Peter Donolo, who is a communications consultant based in Toronto and who was (many years ago) director of communications in the office of Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, takes up, in an opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, the issue of the anachronism of the Canadian royal family that is emerging because of what some … Continue reading Does Megxit beget Rexit?