Doing the right thing, the right way

I really hope that John Ivison, writing in the Calgary Herald, is correct, and former Prime Minister Stephen Harper will remain "above the fray" in the forthcoming Conservative leadership race. People who are close to Mr Harper told Mr Ivison that "the whole business model of his firm Harper & Associates is built on remaining … Continue reading Doing the right thing, the right way

Prognostications (1)

Veteran political commentator Gloria Galloway, writing in the Ottawa Citizen, says, and I agree 100%, that "The Conservatives are, understandably, bitter about losing the 2019 race. It seemed an easy stroll to victory given the blackface incident and other foibles of the Liberals and leader Justin Trudeau." But, she adds, "though the Tories took the … Continue reading Prognostications (1)

Blue-collar conservatism

Aereo is a British left-leaning e-zine (or maybe just a glorified blog) that has been around for just a few years. In a recent (December 2019) article written by its editor, Helen Puckrose and James A Lindsay (both of whom enjoyed a brief moment of fame a year or so ago for writing "20 fake … Continue reading Blue-collar conservatism

Nothing in his office became him like the leaving it

I'm afraid that my slight bastardization of Shakespear's line (Macbeth Act 1, scene 4, 7–8) will be overused in the next few days to describe Andrew Scheer's decision to resign as leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. He did so, we are told, at a special caucus meeting, and then in a graceful speech … Continue reading Nothing in his office became him like the leaving it

The Trudeau train wreck (2)

About ten months ago I wrote about Trudeau's train wreck. That time it was about a CN rail train carrying crude oil that went off the rails near the Saskatchewan-Mantiboa border. Now, of course, days after the event, the Globe and Mail has published a Reuters report which says that "Saskatchewan’s public-safety agency says crews … Continue reading The Trudeau train wreck (2)

A good step in the right direction

I've been banging on about nuclear energy from some months now, starting in June and going on over several posts leading into the fall. I'm sure my views had nothing to do with it, but I am very pleased to see that Doug Ford (Ontario), Blaine Higgs (New Brunswick) and Scott Moe (Saskatchewan) have all … Continue reading A good step in the right direction

Can increased immigration help to reform democracy in Canada?

A few days ago one of my interlocutors asked, in response to one of my posts: "Is it realistic to dispute that under the current ‘first past the post’ electoral system in Canada the country is governed / controlled by the population centre in the ‘Windsor to Quebec City’ corridor? Even today the current minority … Continue reading Can increased immigration help to reform democracy in Canada?