A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press' Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that "Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden … Continue reading A Biden Foreign Policy

Not so fast

The Economist, looking forward to the US November elections, says "Four months ago, Donald Trump’s odds of winning a second term had never looked better. After an easy acquittal in his impeachment trial, his approval rating had reached its highest level in three years, and was approaching the upper-40s range that delivered re-election to George W. … Continue reading Not so fast

Really?

I have written twice, recently, about why Canada and the USA should work together to achieve a substantial measure of continental self-sufficiency. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown us that the existing global supply chains need to be re-evaluated for broader strategic goals ~ not just national security and military aspects, including e.g. the 5G networks, … Continue reading Really?

Exactly back-asswards

I see, in a report in The Guardian, that former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown "has urged world leaders to create a temporary form of global government to tackle the twin medical and economic crises caused by the Covid-19 pandemic ... [and] ... The former Labour prime minister, who was at the centre of the international efforts … Continue reading Exactly back-asswards

Afghanistan in retrospect (3) (the Future?)

Following on from the other day, Dr Carter Malkasian writes, in Foreign Affairs, that in 2015 and 2016 the war in Afghanistan went from bad to worse for the US-supported Afghan government. That rejuvenated Taliban went from victory to victory, from strength to strength. Then, "When President Donald Trump took office in January 2017, the … Continue reading Afghanistan in retrospect (3) (the Future?)

A crisis of governance

I have been arguing for some time that liberalism, and with it democracy, are under stress. I see the stressors coming from two directions: From autocrats like Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping; and From populists ~ Donald J Trump being their frontman. But Thomas Carothers of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, writing in Foreign … Continue reading A crisis of governance

‘Trumpism’ is on the (global) rise

Fareed Zakaria, writing in the Washington Post, says that "President Trump’s speech here at the World Economic Forum  ... [in the week 20-24 January 20202] ... went over relatively well. That’s partly because Davos is a conclave of business executives, and they like Trump’s pro-business message. But mostly, the president’s reception was a testament to … Continue reading ‘Trumpism’ is on the (global) rise

She’s right

Please watch this short video clip (it's only 30 seconds long). It's packed with real facts, with genuine data, in short, with the truth. Governor (Ambassador) and maybe future US presidential candidate Nikki Haley says that: "In the last 70 years ... [i.e. since after I was born] ... over 4 Billion people have been … Continue reading She’s right

Canadians need to pay attention

Following on from my previous post, I suspect that former Governor (South Carolina) and US Ambassador (to the United Nations) Nikki Haley might be President-elect of the United States five years from now. She is, right now, I think, the wholly unofficial but very clear voice of the post-Trump Republicans. She shares many of the … Continue reading Canadians need to pay attention

Nikki Haley in 2024?

Jay Caruso, who writes for several American and British journals, says, in an article in the Independent, that "One of the more disturbing aspects of modern American politics is the ascent of the zero-sum game. The divided culture in which Washington DC and, alas, many state governments operate means the concept of "everyone wins" is … Continue reading Nikki Haley in 2024?