Progress

Seaspan Shipyards in Vancouver has announced that the fist section of the first of two new Joint Support Ships … … being built for the Royal Canadian Navy have been completed. The first section is the massive bulbous bow: Those who might want a bit of information about the bulbous bow’s purpose can watch thisContinue reading “Progress”

A new defence procurement agency?

Gowling WLG, an international law firm, reports that “As part of its 2019 election platform, the federal Liberals announced a plan for the creation of a new Crown agency that would be responsible for conducting procurements on behalf of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces, dubbed “Defence Procurement Canada” … [but]Continue reading “A new defence procurement agency?”

Not as bad as it looks

Murray Brewster, writing for CBC News, says that “The federal government has spent slightly more than $1.01 billion over the last seven years on design and preparatory contracts for the navy’s new frigates and supply ships — and the projects still haven’t bought anything that floats … [and he adds] … It’s an enormous amount ofContinue reading “Not as bad as it looks”

Why we build warships

About 10 years ago, when the national shipbuilding procurement strategy was announced, by the (Conservative) Harper government, there was much discussion about how many ships, what kind of ships and how much money ~ I seem to recall that the government of the day low-balled the costs at $35 Billion, the current Parliamentary Budget OfficerContinue reading “Why we build warships”

Where are we? (5)

I have been worrying about Canada’s sovereignty over the Arctic for some years now. Now I see a report by Levon Sevunts of RCI (Radio Canada International) which says that “2019 marked a busy shipping season in the Canadian Arctic with 27 ships making a full transit through the Northwest Passage, according to statistics releasedContinue reading “Where are we? (5)”

And still a bit more good news

Irving Shipyards, in Halifax, began, on 22 Nov, what are known as ‘builder’s trials’ of the first of the Harry DeWolf class Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) called for by Prime Minister Stephen Harper early in his first mandate and, finally, in the water over ten years later … … despite my often expressed reservationsContinue reading “And still a bit more good news”

More good news

They may not look like much, just now … … but these are “blocks,” at Seaspan Shipyards in Vancouver, and when hundreds of more blocks are built and they are all, eventually fitted together they will become one of these …  … the new Protectuer class support ships (two are on order) for the RoyalContinue reading “More good news”

A bit more good news

I see that the third in the series of Off-Shore Fisheries Science Vessels (OFSV 3) is now structurally complete … … the first two (CCGS Sir John Franklin and the future CCGS Capt. Jacques Cartier) are in the water, undergoing sea-trials or being fitted out. This is good news for two reasons: The National ShipbuildingContinue reading “A bit more good news”

More about ships (My plan (4))

There is an interesting discussion, over in Army.ca, about the current “tanker war” in the Persian Gulf-Straits of Hormuz-Gulf of Oman region. One participant raises the very, very valid point that limited defence budgets mean that some countries (Britain and Canada come to mind very quickly) cannot afford large enough fleets of first-rate, general-purpose combatContinue reading “More about ships (My plan (4))”

The federal government does the right thing …

Parliamentary Affairs reporter Daniel Leblanc, writing in the Globe and Mail, says that “The federal government will award a third of the work on $1.5-billion of maintenance contracts on its military frigates to the Davie shipyard in Quebec, cementing the shipyard’s anticipated partnership with two other firms on Canada’s national shipbuilding strategy, federal officials sayContinue reading “The federal government does the right thing …”