Divisions

Mark Joseph is an American multimedia producer (I’m not exactly sure what that means, I know what the words mean, I just don’t know how a multimedia production differs from, say, a film or a TV show), talk-show host, columnist, author and publisher, about whom I knew absolutely nothing until I stumbled upon an articleContinue reading “Divisions”

Is this a ‘Boston Tea Party moment?’

One commentator on social media dubbed this … … the moment when Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault said that the Trudeau regime plans to license news websites as a ‘Boston Tea Pary moment.’ She was referring to the protest, in December of 1773, when angry American colonists (many dressed as Native Americans to try and hideContinue reading “Is this a ‘Boston Tea Party moment?’”

Fixing our foreign policy

Yesterday I wrote about the Alliance For Multilateralism which I believe is: Harmless, at worst; and Likely off to a shaky start because it already (see link above) includes a few (which is too many) countries which are either weak democracies or hardly democratic at all. That being said, Canada belongs in it because weContinue reading “Fixing our foreign policy”

Prognostications (3)

The Eurasia Group‘s President, Ian Bremmer and its Chairman Cliff Kupchan, writing in their annual “risk list,” say that “We’ve never listed US domestic politics as the top risk, mainly because US institutions are among the world’s strongest and most resilient … [but, they write] … This year, those institutions will be tested in unprecedentedContinue reading “Prognostications (3)”

A sad litany of failures

There is an interesting article by Rachel Browne in Global News‘ ‘Decision Canada 2019‘ section headlined: “In 2015, Justin Trudeau declared ‘Canada is back’— so where are we now?” It begins by remembering that “Right after Justin Trudeau led the Liberals to a strong victory in the 2015 federal election, he declared that he would also guide CanadaContinue reading “A sad litany of failures”

Canada’s (missing) foreign policy

Two days ago I said that “there is a real, measurable difference between the Conservatives and the Trudeau Liberals on important vital strategic issues. Justin Trudeau and Chrystia Freeland have failed pretty much every test, including renegotiating NAFTA. Why would anyone trust them with the reins of government again?” Then, yesterday I said “Canada and Canadians, and liberals and democratsContinue reading “Canada’s (missing) foreign policy”

What Canada needs

Just the other day I suggested that everyone, including Canada, will have to adapt to whatever happens in the United Kingdom over the next 100(-) days. John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, picks up on that and puts some flesh on the bare bones of my concerns. “On Oct. 21, voters will chooseContinue reading “What Canada needs”

Numbers

So, summer is here and it’s polling season, too. MPs are home, in their ridings, reconnecting with constituents, hopefully recharging their own political batteries and, in most cases, gearing up for the last, crucial, 48 days between Labour Day, when I expect to see all them in local parades and at festivals, and Sunday, OctoberContinue reading “Numbers”

More good news

Steven Chase and Robert Fife, writing in the Globe and Mail, say that “Ethics in government is shaping up as the biggest issue for voters in the approaching federal vote, outdistancing the economy, the environment and trade with the United States, according to a new poll conducted for The Globe and Mail … [and] … AContinue reading “More good news”

Everyman’s Strategic Survey: Words of wisdom

You can, and everyone with an interest in the global strategic situation and, especially, the evolving relationship between America and China should watch/listen to and read Lee Hsien Loong, Prime Minister of Singapore’s, address to the 2019 Shangri-la Dialogue. It stands, in my considered opinion, as a truly expert strategic survey of the current global situationContinue reading “Everyman’s Strategic Survey: Words of wisdom”