Who is she trying to fool?

As is so often the case I find myself agreeing with the Globe and Mail‘s John Ibbitson when he says, in a recent column in that newspaper, that “Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland’s fall economic statement is an act of deception – or maybe self-deception … [because] … While this Liberal government promises to invest up to $100-billionContinue reading “Who is she trying to fool?”

Getting it exactly wrong

In my arguments that try to encourage the Conservative Party to explore the possibility of a Universal Basic Income/Guaranteed Annual Income based on Milton Friedman’s idea of a Negative Income Tax, I stress that there must be one basic principle: “people who work will always make more than people who don’t.” But, as I mentionedContinue reading “Getting it exactly wrong”

Real priorities

High ranking Conservative MP Michelle Rempel-Garner is getting some serious criticism for a remark that I wish she hadn’t made, but it points up a bigger problem. As generally liberal political strategist and analyst Rick Anderson says: I agree and I am as guilty as anyone of “cheap partisanship.” I still guess that we areContinue reading “Real priorities”

Is Conservatism Dead?

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says what I suspect many are thinking: “The lacklustre race for leader of the Conservative Party of Canada is further evidence of the impossibility of conservatism in our time.“ It’s not that conservatism is dead, he says, but, he explains, and I agree that “in this century,Continue reading “Is Conservatism Dead?”

Tribes

So, a few years ago Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, speaking at New York University, talked about tribes and tribalism and the perils of both. It wasn’t a bad speech … the points about belonging versus exclusivity and exclusion are still good. But the prime minister may have ignored the tribe to which he belongs …Continue reading “Tribes”

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur’s idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says thatContinue reading “Boring, but vital”

The right thing to do?

John Ibbitson, who is described as “a writer-at-large” for the Globe and Mail (I think that means senior columnist who is given carte balance on topics) and David Parkinson, who is the Good Grey Globe‘s economics columnist have, in an opinion piece, opened the pandora’s box of a universal basic income. Bravo! And medals forContinue reading “The right thing to do?”

The Conservative problem

Andrew MacDougall, a senior public relations consultant in London (the big, British London, not London, Ontario) and a former head of PR in former prime minister Stephen Harper’s PMO, has penned an important opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, that I really hope the high-foreheads in the Conservative Party‘s HQ all read and takeContinue reading “The Conservative problem”

A crisis of governance

I have been arguing for some time that liberalism, and with it democracy, are under stress. I see the stressors coming from two directions: From autocrats like Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping; and From populists ~ Donald J Trump being their frontman. But Thomas Carothers of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, writing in ForeignContinue reading “A crisis of governance”

The Precariat squared

I have written, several times before about the precariat (which is sometimes defined as a social class formed by people suffering from precarity, which is a condition of existence without predictability or security, affecting material or psychological welfare). The main problem of the precariat is the very precariousness (hence the term) of its day-to-day andContinue reading “The Precariat squared”