Remember CD Howe?

Not many people, unless you’re my age or older, remember when CD Howe was in the news almost every day, even on the cover of Time magazine. Canada was on the move, Canada had emerged from the Second World War and from Korea as a leading middle power and we were growing by leaps andContinue reading “Remember CD Howe?”

Short of war (5)

I think that a new cold war, Cold War 2.0 if you like, “managed,” as former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd explained on the basis of Managed Strategic Competition, is the best and most likely way to avoid a real, deadly hot (shooting) war between China and America supported by the US-led West. I believeContinue reading “Short of war (5)”

Getting it right

A few days ago I said that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had gotten things wrong, again, regarding India. Now I see, in an article in the South China Morning Post, that the British Prime Minister has gotten things right. The article says that “British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has invited India, South Korea and AustraliaContinue reading “Getting it right”

I have a dream …

I mentioned, a couple of months ago, my hopes, for the Conservative Party under Erin O’Toole’s leadership. Now, borrowing a famous phrase from a great man: I have a dream … I have a dream that one day, soon, this nation will come to its senses and that the people in the suburbs around Halifax,Continue reading “I have a dream …”

Those fabulous fifties?

Anyone else remember the 1950s? Norman Spector, a former federal and provincial public servant, who served at the very highest levels of government, diplomat (Ambassador to Israel), corporate “communications” (public relations) guru and author, remembers: And so do I. But I don’t just remember high school dances and young love, because the 1950s were aContinue reading “Those fabulous fifties?”

A strategy of resilience

Professor Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt University) is a moderate progressive Democrat in US terms. He has been a policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren ~ he is well to the right of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and, probably, very slightly to the left of Joe Biden. He has written a provocative article in Foreign AffairsContinue reading “A strategy of resilience”

And I disagree, again

So, yesterday, I said I disagreed with the Globe and Mail‘s John Ibbitson about how much we should “welcome” a Biden-Harris administration in Washington. He was right to point out that, in general, Canada fares better when Republicans (Eisenhower, Reagan, Bush) are in the White House rather than Democrats (Kennedy, Johnson, Carter, Obama). Donald JContinue reading “And I disagree, again”

What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Journalist and sometimes politician Stephen Taylor, writing in the National Post, says, and I agree with him, fully, that “The existence of the Wexit movement is a national tragedy … [because] … The Wexit movement is the latest uproar of Canadian regional populism. Canada’s bifurcation of haves and have-nots, contented and aggrieved, elites and non-elitesContinue reading “What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*”

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else’s ideas about nationalism, I said, “I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land whileContinue reading “Building a better nationalism (2)”

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It’s a bit disjointed, I’m afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin TrudeauContinue reading “Doing the heavy lifting”