I have a dream …

I mentioned, a couple of months ago, my hopes, for the Conservative Party under Erin O'Toole's leadership. Now, borrowing a famous phrase from a great man: I have a dream ... I have a dream that one day, soon, this nation will come to its senses and that the people in the suburbs around Halifax, … Continue reading I have a dream …

Those fabulous fifties?

Anyone else remember the 1950s? Norman Spector, a former federal and provincial public servant, who served at the very highest levels of government, diplomat (Ambassador to Israel), corporate "communications" (public relations) guru and author, remembers: And so do I. But I don't just remember high school dances and young love, because the 1950s were a … Continue reading Those fabulous fifties?

A strategy of resilience

Professor Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt University) is a moderate progressive Democrat in US terms. He has been a policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren ~ he is well to the right of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and, probably, very slightly to the left of Joe Biden. He has written a provocative article in Foreign Affairs … Continue reading A strategy of resilience

And I disagree, again

So, yesterday, I said I disagreed with the Globe and Mail's John Ibbitson about how much we should "welcome" a Biden-Harris administration in Washington. He was right to point out that, in general, Canada fares better when Republicans (Eisenhower, Reagan, Bush) are in the White House rather than Democrats (Kennedy, Johnson, Carter, Obama). Donald J … Continue reading And I disagree, again

What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Journalist and sometimes politician Stephen Taylor, writing in the National Post, says, and I agree with him, fully, that "The existence of the Wexit movement is a national tragedy ... [because] ... The Wexit movement is the latest uproar of Canadian regional populism. Canada’s bifurcation of haves and have-nots, contented and aggrieved, elites and non-elites … Continue reading What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting

It boggles the mind

Despite my remarks, yesterday, or, at least as I warned in the last sentence, this is a highly partisan post, it's a bit of a rant, actually, because I see in an article by Mike Blanchfield of the Canadian Press, published on National Newswatch that Canada's man-child, trust-fund-kid, limousine-liberal prime minister, Justin Trudeau indirectly compares … Continue reading It boggles the mind

Yesterday …

Yesterday was 'Liberation Day' (Bevrijdingsdag) in the Netherlands.  May 5th marks the end of the German occupation which lasted from May 1940 until May 1945. It follows the Remembrance of the Dead Day (Dodenherdenking) which is held on 4 May. That's when our Dutch friends remember all civilians and members of the armed forces of … Continue reading Yesterday …

Getting Canada on the right track

David Mulroney, a former very senior official and Canada's ambassador to China, said, on social media, a few days ago, that "Serious countries like the UK, France and Australia have spoken frankly about the cost of China's lack of transparency in the Covid19 pandemic, something that will almost certainly shape their policies post-crisis. This offers … Continue reading Getting Canada on the right track