Is Conservatism Dead?

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says what I suspect many are thinking: "The lacklustre race for leader of the Conservative Party of Canada is further evidence of the impossibility of conservatism in our time." It's not that conservatism is dead, he says, but, he explains, and I agree that "in this century, … Continue reading Is Conservatism Dead?

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur's idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that … Continue reading Boring, but vital

An important anniversary

Two hundred and five years ago the fate of the world hung in the balance. Napolean Boneparte, a master tactician but, fortunately, a deeply flawed strategist, had returned from exile, recreated his Army and was threatening to topple Europe, again, and impose his very, very illiberal rule on the continent. Happily, the Duke Of Wellington … Continue reading An important anniversary

Democracy is in peril

About 1,500 years ago, in Saxon England, the nobles of the realm, the bishops, abbots (and abbesses) and the ealdormen and thegns and others would gather, fairly regularly, in an assembly to advise and, sometimes, to constrain the king. In a very typically English manner, they hit upon the notion that the kings were not, … Continue reading Democracy is in peril

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

Don’t talk, Act!

I see in The Guardian that "seven former Conservative and Labour UK foreign secretaries have come together to declare ...[that] ... Britain must take the lead in co-ordinating the international response to China’s efforts to impose draconian security laws in Hong Kong." They have written a letter to UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab suggesting that … Continue reading Don’t talk, Act!

A question for Prime Minister Trudeau

It's a simple enough question, Sir. Are the people of Hong Kong not worthy of their freedom? Is there something fundamentally wrong with them? Is there some reason that you have not joined hands with US President Trump and condemned China's actions in destroying the "one country, two systems" regime that was supposed to protect … Continue reading A question for Prime Minister Trudeau

Reviving democracy

Lorrie Goldstein, a veteran Toronto Sun journalist and a constant critic of Justin Trudeau's inept management of government, was, I hope, only trying to stir up a little controversy when he said, just the other day, on social media:   My hope is that he was trying, indirectly, to remind us that we, Canadians, and … Continue reading Reviving democracy

Justin Trudeau does the right thing

I see, on BNN Bloomberg, that "Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has rejected Donald Trump's latest proposal to readmit Russia to the G7, stoking old divisions between the American president and the rest of the group ... [and] ... Trump was to host the G7 summit later this month but postponed it to the fall because of … Continue reading Justin Trudeau does the right thing