China’s future

Remember, back in 2013, well before the Liberals won the 2015 election, when Justin Trudeau said: "There's a level of admiration I actually have for China, because [of] their basic dictatorship." He doubled down on those remarks, explaining that "his comment was a reflection on a growing economy." In fact, he wasn't alone in that … Continue reading China’s future

I really don’t understand …

... what Xi Jinping and the small handful of men and women who surround him are thinking. I cannot make any strategic sense out of their handling of the Hong Kong situation. It seems to me, and I would be very grateful if someone would tell me why and how I am wrong, that a … Continue reading I really don’t understand …

Canada’s (missing) foreign policy

Two days ago I said that "there is a real, measurable difference between the Conservatives and the Trudeau Liberals on important vital strategic issues. Justin Trudeau and Chrystia Freeland have failed pretty much every test, including renegotiating NAFTA. Why would anyone trust them with the reins of government again?" Then, yesterday I said "Canada and Canadians, and liberals and democrats … Continue reading Canada’s (missing) foreign policy

A new Hong Kong strategy?

Those who know me, personally, will also know that the ongoing political crisis in Hong Kong is at the top of my mind, but I have refrained from discussing it because I'm not sure I understand enough of the nuances. Maybe I still don't, but here goes ... I think I might understand why the … Continue reading A new Hong Kong strategy?

Trudeau’s foreign policy failure … and another prescription for saving the liberal order

The Globe and Mail's award-winning international affairs correspondent Doug Saunders, someone with whom I (almost equally) often disagree and agree, has penned an insightful piece in the Good Grey Globe in which he says that "Suddenly, Canada finds itself almost alone in the world, with a Liberal government realizing that its optimistic foreign policy no … Continue reading Trudeau’s foreign policy failure … and another prescription for saving the liberal order

Saving the liberal world order: what middle powers might be able to do …

I said, yesterday, that Canada should be doing what it can, hopefully even playing a leading role in restraining Cold War 2.0, which is both unnecessary and, in my opinion, ill-conceived. Professor Roland Paris, of the University of Ottawa, a political scientist and former foreign policy advisor to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has written a … Continue reading Saving the liberal world order: what middle powers might be able to do …

Cold War 2.0 (2)

A few days ago I quoted Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong of Singapore who, in his opening address to the Shangri-la 2019 Dialogue,* which is (self) described by the International Institute of Strategic Studies as “Asia's premier defence summit … [which] … has built confidence and fostered practical security cooperation, by facilitating easy communication and … Continue reading Cold War 2.0 (2)