A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It's a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson … Continue reading A G-something?

Is Conservatism Dead?

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says what I suspect many are thinking: "The lacklustre race for leader of the Conservative Party of Canada is further evidence of the impossibility of conservatism in our time." It's not that conservatism is dead, he says, but, he explains, and I agree that "in this century, … Continue reading Is Conservatism Dead?

Military reserves

For those interested, and every thinking Canadian should have some, albeit limited interest in the subject, there is an interesting thread over on Army.ca which deals with the problems (there are a lot of them) in making Canada's reserve Army (the militia if you're old enough) into an effective force. I'm going to go with … Continue reading Military reserves

Is the worst over?

European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde is a very smart person and, on Friday, according to a report by Reuters, she said that Europe "is “probably past” the worst of the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic, but the recovery will be uneven ... [and] ... Speaking as fears of a second wave shook investors … Continue reading Is the worst over?

Why does this not surprise me?

This article in the National Post just caused me (and many of my friends and former colleagues with, in total, centuries of experience in National Defence Headquarters)  to shrug. You might have looked for at least an eye-roll, but, no, all it rated was a shrug. What didn't surprise anyone? Well, according to the Canadian … Continue reading Why does this not surprise me?

Democracy is in peril

About 1,500 years ago, in Saxon England, the nobles of the realm, the bishops, abbots (and abbesses) and the ealdormen and thegns and others would gather, fairly regularly, in an assembly to advise and, sometimes, to constrain the king. In a very typically English manner, they hit upon the notion that the kings were not, … Continue reading Democracy is in peril

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)

Canadian politicians have lost the country

I was being a bit tongue-in-cheek about a week ago when asked: "Have we gone mad?" I was surprised to find that many, Many, MANY Canadians agreed with me when I said: "I think so." For the record, it's a good thing to be against racism. Racism is stupid and destructive to our society, too. … Continue reading Canadian politicians have lost the country

Don’t talk, Act!

I see in The Guardian that "seven former Conservative and Labour UK foreign secretaries have come together to declare ...[that] ... Britain must take the lead in co-ordinating the international response to China’s efforts to impose draconian security laws in Hong Kong." They have written a letter to UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab suggesting that … Continue reading Don’t talk, Act!

A question for Prime Minister Trudeau

It's a simple enough question, Sir. Are the people of Hong Kong not worthy of their freedom? Is there something fundamentally wrong with them? Is there some reason that you have not joined hands with US President Trump and condemned China's actions in destroying the "one country, two systems" regime that was supposed to protect … Continue reading A question for Prime Minister Trudeau