Strategy vs Tactics

I have commented, very often, on grand strategy, strategy in various fields and tactics, also in many different fields. It has always seemed to me that both America and China were good at grand strategy. I think we saw two "master classes" in the 1940s, when Roosevelt, Stimson, Knox and Marshall set out the aims … Continue reading Strategy vs Tactics

Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)

A few weeks ago I commented on the long (2001 to 2014) Afghanistan campaign ... one hesitates to call it a war; the Canadian Forces were, pretty clearly, at war; Canada was, equally clearly, not. It was Canada's largest and most costly, in both blood and treasure, military operation since Korea (1950 to 1953) but … Continue reading Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)

Another kick in the groin … and we need to recover

I see an article by Robert Fife and Marieke Walsh in the Globe and Mail which says that "Teck Resources Ltd. is pulling its application for the massive Frontier oil sands mine in Alberta, citing the need for Canada to finalize its climate-change policies and determine how resource development fits within them ... [and] ... After … Continue reading Another kick in the groin … and we need to recover

A coalition?

I have been saying, for some months now, that "The CPC might be able to form a minority government but it is equally, perhaps even more likely that Justin Trudeau, with the formal support of Jagmeet Singh, would be able to continue to govern with some support from the BQ and the Greens on an … Continue reading A coalition?

“Mad Dog” speaks; Canada should listen

It is no secret that I am an admirer of retired US Marine Corps General and former US Secretary of Defense James "Mad Dog" Mattis; in fact, back in April of 2016 I hoped that he would run for president of the USA to spare America from having to choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton … Continue reading “Mad Dog” speaks; Canada should listen

Two issues

John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, touches on a couple of issues that always concern me: restoring correct relations, including free(er) trade with China and immigration policy, and he revisits his thesis, in his recent book (with Darell Bricker), Empty Planet, which says that global populations are declining, even collapsing, in China's case. "Canada’s … Continue reading Two issues

Foreign policy fumbles

A bit more than a week ago, Graeme Gordon, a freelance journalist, published by True North (which self-describes as "a registered Canadian charity ... [which is] ... independent and non-partisan ... [that conducts] ... policy research on immigration and integration issues and provide timely investigative reports on issues that affect Canada’s national security") said that "The … Continue reading Foreign policy fumbles

Not a good day for Justin Trudeau … or for Canada

Well, the reviews are in, and, not surprisingly: John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says that "Justin Trudeau should ask the Governor-General to dissolve Parliament immediately, with a general election to follow in April. Instead, he and his remaining advisers will likely hunker down and hope that time dulls the public outrage over … Continue reading Not a good day for Justin Trudeau … or for Canada

Cabinet making

A friend and regular interlocutor, reacting to a comment I made about a week ago, suggesting that the Trudeau cabinet is still too large, challenged me to look at the "ideal" cabinet. Now, it is certainly no secret that I think the "best" government Canada ever had, in modern times, say during the past century, … Continue reading Cabinet making

Some more China worries

The term "a G Zero world" was coined, a few years ago, by Ian Bremmer, CEO of the Eurasia Group in a book entitled: "Every Nation for Itself: What Happens When No One Leads the World." He then created a web site called G Zero Media, which is, I think, generally, pro-globalization and anti-Donald Trump. … Continue reading Some more China worries