Trudeau’s best hope

John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, warns that "Financial crises can benefit a party in government, if voters decide the leader is capable and committed ... [as they did, he says, with only Jean Chrétien and Stephen Harper over the last 65 years] ... More often, they’re a political disaster ... [and, he … Continue reading Trudeau’s best hope

Its time to put liberalism back in the Liberal Party of Canada

I self-identify as a classical liberal: please take a quick look at my site's (longish) title just above. Liberals like me look back past the Glorious Revolution of 1688,  past Simon de Montfort's Great Parliament in 1265, even past Aristotle and Plato, the origins of liberalism might go all the way back to the original … Continue reading Its time to put liberalism back in the Liberal Party of Canada

Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)

A few weeks ago I commented on the long (2001 to 2014) Afghanistan campaign ... one hesitates to call it a war; the Canadian Forces were, pretty clearly, at war; Canada was, equally clearly, not. It was Canada's largest and most costly, in both blood and treasure, military operation since Korea (1950 to 1953) but … Continue reading Afghanistan in retrospect (2) (History)

Resetting our foreign policy

It is no secret, I think, to anyone who follows this blog that I regard Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's white paper on foreign policy, 'A Foreign Policy for Canadians,' as having been an act of policy vandalism. I continue to believe that Pierre Trudeau was driven by an intense need to find a way to … Continue reading Resetting our foreign policy

How bilingual? (2)

Rosemary Barton, CBC News' newly-minted Chief Political Correspondent visits my issue of "How bilingual?" in an Analysis (in reality and opinion piece) which could, pretty clearly, have been written by any recent Liberal prime minister's Director of Communications. (Maybe she's looking for a new job given that Kate Purchase jumped ship in late December and … Continue reading How bilingual? (2)

How to lose the next election

Jonathan Kay, an excellent journalist and commentator, posted this on social media a couple of days ago: This is the full image: That is, I think, what we are watching the Democratic Party do in the United States this year. It is why I continue, quite confidently, to predict that Donald J Trump will be … Continue reading How to lose the next election

How bilingual?

There is a provocative opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, by journalist, author and publisher Kenneth Whyte, who is, also, Chair of the Board of the (fairly conservative) Donner Canadian Foundation, which did not, I think, get sufficient attention. In it, he says that it’s time the Conservative Party reconsidered its unstated but very … Continue reading How bilingual?