It is time (2)

Yesterday, I said that despite his many and manifest failures as a leader and as a person, Canadians remain likely to vote for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party because: They are, broadly and generally, satisfied with the way he has tried to help Canadians through the COVID-19 pandemic ~ mainly by by spending lots …

I’m blaming others …

… for this post. I tried to explain, simply, Ihoped, to an acquaintance why getting cheap, reliable high-speed Internet service to remote areas is so difficult. I was encouraged to say more and here are some thoughts. First, a bit of history. The way we, the whole world, “built-out” first telephone, then cable TV and …

Do Something (2)

A few weeks ago I was horrified to read about the 25 year long water problems that continue to plague the Neskantaga First Nation in North-Western Ontario ~ yes you read that right: it’s been 25 years since these Canadians have had clean, potable water! I begged the government to Do Something! and I offered …

Self-sufficiency

The National Post, in an editorial-like, unsigned, “National Post View” says that “The global pandemic is forcing Canadians to consider, for the first time in generations, how precarious our standard of living has become. International trade has contributed greatly to our prosperity. Canadian resources, innovations and services are valued the world over — when it …

A fundamental shift?

Professor Branko Milanović, formerly lead economist in the World Bank Research Department, writes, in Foreign Affairs, that “As of March 2020, the entire world is affected by an evil with which it is incapable of dealing effectively and regarding whose duration no one can make any serious predictions. The economic repercussions of the novel coronavirus …

The smart path

About a week ago, before the COVID-19 virus dominated every discussion, The Spectator said that “Not long ago, Brexit used to dominate every debate. Now, it’s climate change. Political discussions can’t take place these days without some reference to the Government’s big mission: the legally-binding commitment to reach net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Britain was …

What?

The Post Millennial, which is usually a fairly reliable (albeit somewhat breathless) source of hard news says, quoting Blacklock’s Reporter, which I have found to be also pretty fair and accurate, that “Justin Trudeau’s Department of Infrastructure, which is headed by the ever-controversial Catherine McKenna, cannot account for billions of taxpayer money.” The report explains …

Trudeau’s best hope

John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, warns that “Financial crises can benefit a party in government, if voters decide the leader is capable and committed … [as they did, he says, with only Jean Chrétien and Stephen Harper over the last 65 years] … More often, they’re a political disaster … [and, he …

A new defence procurement agency?

Gowling WLG, an international law firm, reports that “As part of its 2019 election platform, the federal Liberals announced a plan for the creation of a new Crown agency that would be responsible for conducting procurements on behalf of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces, dubbed “Defence Procurement Canada” … [but] …

Another kick in the groin … and we need to recover

I see an article by Robert Fife and Marieke Walsh in the Globe and Mail which says that “Teck Resources Ltd. is pulling its application for the massive Frontier oil sands mine in Alberta, citing the need for Canada to finalize its climate-change policies and determine how resource development fits within them … [and] … After …