A fundamental shift?

Professor Branko Milanović, formerly lead economist in the World Bank Research Department, writes, in Foreign Affairs, that "As of March 2020, the entire world is affected by an evil with which it is incapable of dealing effectively and regarding whose duration no one can make any serious predictions. The economic repercussions of the novel coronavirus … Continue reading A fundamental shift?

Another “exactly right” notion

David Staples, an award-winning journalist, writing about a week ago in the Edmonton Journal, got it exactly right. After noting, correctly, that "There are a good number of sober, sensible actions that will change the world from a smoggy and smoky place into a clean and prosperous home for us all ... [but] ... Lashing out … Continue reading Another “exactly right” notion

Afghanistan in retrospect (3) (the Future?)

Following on from the other day, Dr Carter Malkasian writes, in Foreign Affairs, that in 2015 and 2016 the war in Afghanistan went from bad to worse for the US-supported Afghan government. That rejuvenated Taliban went from victory to victory, from strength to strength. Then, "When President Donald Trump took office in January 2017, the … Continue reading Afghanistan in retrospect (3) (the Future?)

Resetting our foreign policy

It is no secret, I think, to anyone who follows this blog that I regard Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's white paper on foreign policy, 'A Foreign Policy for Canadians,' as having been an act of policy vandalism. I continue to believe that Pierre Trudeau was driven by an intense need to find a way to … Continue reading Resetting our foreign policy

A crisis of governance

I have been arguing for some time that liberalism, and with it democracy, are under stress. I see the stressors coming from two directions: From autocrats like Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping; and From populists ~ Donald J Trump being their frontman. But Thomas Carothers of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, writing in Foreign … Continue reading A crisis of governance

A good question

Noted historian Niall Ferguson asks, on social media: He said, in an interview with CNBC, that "there's a cognitive dissonance at the heart of Davos ... [because] ... Publicly, you have to agree with Greta Thunberg and you have to be part of the virtue-signaling community on climate change, on ESG ... [but] ... Privately, … Continue reading A good question

More on immigration

Linda Nazareth, who is an economist and a self-described 'futurist,' and a regular contributor to the Globe and Mail, has written a useful opinion piece for that journal in which she follows up on some thoughts from the World Economic Forum. The world she (and they) says can be seen like this*: Most of Africa, … Continue reading More on immigration