Short of war (2)

Following on from yesterday with former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s suggestion for how to contain China without stating an all-out shooting war, he says that amongst Xi Jinping’s goals are: First, he wants “to remain in power until 2035, by which time he will be 82, the age at which Mao passed away. Xi’s …

Apologies to the Bard, but …

… The country doth protest too much, methinks. I see, in a social media post by Chinese state media outlet Global Times … … that the Chinese government is annoyed by what appears to be a continuation, by the Biden administration, of the Trump regime’s policy of calling China out for every breach of the …

Cold War 2.0: Standing up for Taiwan

I want to return to a topic with which I have dealt several times: Taiwan. Further, I want to revisit an article upon which I have already commented: “American Support for Taiwan Must Be Unambiguous: To Keep the Peace, Make Clear to China That Force Won’t Stand,” By Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign …

An opportunity

So, I saw two things: First, on my own social media feed, in response to my contention that a (reported) majority of Canadians is wrong and Canada must become “bigger and better” in the 21st century by adapting our immigration regime to accepting many more immigrants, year-after-year and decade-after-decade, there was this: That’s arrant nonsense …

It is time (3)

A couple of days ago I said, “I want the Conservative Party to tell us how they plan to take Canada forward, to make Canada bigger and better.” We’re already a big country, geographically, the 2nd largest landmass in the world and we have the world’s longest coastline with seaports on three oceans and deep …

Who is she trying to fool?

As is so often the case I find myself agreeing with the Globe and Mail’s John Ibbitson when he says, in a recent column in that newspaper, that “Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland’s fall economic statement is an act of deception – or maybe self-deception … [because] … While this Liberal government promises to invest up to $100-billion …

There’s not much choice

“In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age.” former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. “In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for having …

It’s time for Canada to step up

Just a few days ago British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said, in the House of Commons that “”We made clear that if China continued down this path we would introduce a new route for those with British National (Overseas) status to enter the UK, granting them limited leave to remain with the ability to live …

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur’s idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that …

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: “Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?” The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, “Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets.” The “rule of law” is dying …