Short of war (2)

Following on from yesterday with former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s suggestion for how to contain China without stating an all-out shooting war, he says that amongst Xi Jinping’s goals are: First, he wants “to remain in power until 2035, by which time he will be 82, the age at which Mao passed away. Xi’sContinue reading “Short of war (2)”

Apologies to the Bard, but …

… The country doth protest too much, methinks. I see, in a social media post by Chinese state media outlet Global Times … … that the Chinese government is annoyed by what appears to be a continuation, by the Biden administration, of the Trump regime’s policy of calling China out for every breach of theContinue reading “Apologies to the Bard, but …”

Cold War 2.0: Standing up for Taiwan

I want to return to a topic with which I have dealt several times: Taiwan. Further, I want to revisit an article upon which I have already commented: “American Support for Taiwan Must Be Unambiguous: To Keep the Peace, Make Clear to China That Force Won’t Stand,” By Richard Haass, president of the Council on ForeignContinue reading “Cold War 2.0: Standing up for Taiwan”

An opportunity

So, I saw two things: First, on my own social media feed, in response to my contention that a (reported) majority of Canadians is wrong and Canada must become “bigger and better” in the 21st century by adapting our immigration regime to accepting many more immigrants, year-after-year and decade-after-decade, there was this: That’s arrant nonsenseContinue reading “An opportunity”

It is time (3)

A couple of days ago I said, “I want the Conservative Party to tell us how they plan to take Canada forward, to make Canada bigger and better.“ We’re already a big country, geographically, the 2nd largest landmass in the world and we have the world’s longest coastline with seaports on three oceans and deepContinue reading “It is time (3)”

Who is she trying to fool?

As is so often the case I find myself agreeing with the Globe and Mail‘s John Ibbitson when he says, in a recent column in that newspaper, that “Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland’s fall economic statement is an act of deception – or maybe self-deception … [because] … While this Liberal government promises to invest up to $100-billionContinue reading “Who is she trying to fool?”

There’s not much choice

“In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age.” former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. “In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for havingContinue reading “There’s not much choice”

It’s time for Canada to step up

Just a few days ago British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said, in the House of Commons that ““We made clear that if China continued down this path we would introduce a new route for those with British National (Overseas) status to enter the UK, granting them limited leave to remain with the ability to liveContinue reading “It’s time for Canada to step up”

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur’s idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says thatContinue reading “Boring, but vital”

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: “Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?” The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, “Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets.” The “rule of law” is dyingContinue reading “The answer is …”