There’s not much choice

"In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age." former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. "In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for having … Continue reading There’s not much choice

It’s time for Canada to step up

Just a few days ago British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said, in the House of Commons that ""We made clear that if China continued down this path we would introduce a new route for those with British National (Overseas) status to enter the UK, granting them limited leave to remain with the ability to live … Continue reading It’s time for Canada to step up

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur's idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that … Continue reading Boring, but vital

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

Don’t talk, Act!

I see in The Guardian that "seven former Conservative and Labour UK foreign secretaries have come together to declare ...[that] ... Britain must take the lead in co-ordinating the international response to China’s efforts to impose draconian security laws in Hong Kong." They have written a letter to UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab suggesting that … Continue reading Don’t talk, Act!

A question for Prime Minister Trudeau

It's a simple enough question, Sir. Are the people of Hong Kong not worthy of their freedom? Is there something fundamentally wrong with them? Is there some reason that you have not joined hands with US President Trump and condemned China's actions in destroying the "one country, two systems" regime that was supposed to protect … Continue reading A question for Prime Minister Trudeau

A step in the right direction

A tip of the hat to Liberal MP Michael Levitt, York Centre, who chairs the House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development because, according to a report in the Globe and Mail, he and three other Commonwealth heads of similar committees, "including Australian David Fawcett, the U.K.’s Tom Tugendhat and Simon O’Connor from New Zealand," … Continue reading A step in the right direction

Another no brainer (2)

A few weeks ago I said that a recent batch of asylum seekers from Hong Hong consists of people who "are both legitimate, they are, it is perfectly clear, fleeing persecution, and they are making their applications legally and properly, at Canadian border centres, rather than sneaking into the country illegally. So there should be … Continue reading Another no brainer (2)

Relationships

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, whose insights into China have caused me to comment before, writes, in an article in Foreign Affairs, that  "despite the best efforts of ideological warriors in Beijing and Washington, the uncomfortable truth is that China and the United States are both likely to emerge from this [global pandemic] crisis … Continue reading Relationships

Please (2)

Please, dear readers, understand what China is doing to Hong Kong, right now. As The Economist explains, Li Keqiang, the Chinese prime minister, told the rubber-stamp National People's Congress that he is "establishing a “sound” legal system to ensure national security in Hong Kong, which has flourished in part because of its independent judiciary and … Continue reading Please (2)