How to win Cold War 2.0

Robert M Gates, who was both the United States' Director of Central Intelligence (1991-93 under President George HW Bush) and Secretary of Defence for both Presidents George W Bush and Barack Obama (2006-2011), writes in Foreign Affairs, that "Even before the virus struck, there was broad bipartisan agreement that Washington should reduce its commitments abroad … Continue reading How to win Cold War 2.0

A foreign policy choice for Canada

So, two things caught my eye last week: first, in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson quoted a room full of (mostly young and über-bright) Canadian academics, all of whom are moaning about Canada's foreign policy being off the rails; then, over in Foreign Affairs, a world-famous strategic thinker, Professor G John Ikenberry, from Princeton … Continue reading A foreign policy choice for Canada

The real threat to world peace

Gideon Rachman, writing in the Financial Times, says that "The Sino-Soviet split was a critical moment in the cold war. A Sino-Indian split could be just as crucial to the “second cold war” that seems to be developing between the US and China. Until now, the Indian government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has … Continue reading The real threat to world peace

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

An important anniversary

Two hundred and five years ago the fate of the world hung in the balance. Napolean Boneparte, a master tactician but, fortunately, a deeply flawed strategist, had returned from exile, recreated his Army and was threatening to topple Europe, again, and impose his very, very illiberal rule on the continent. Happily, the Duke Of Wellington … Continue reading An important anniversary

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all ... they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump's notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from our … Continue reading Not inconsistent

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

A Three Ocean Navy

Over on Army.ca (there's an identical (in content) Navy.ca, too, if you prefer blue), there's an interesting new discussion based on a recent article published by the Center for International Maritime Security (CIMSEC). It raises an important issue for Canadians. Canada is a three ocean country ... ... and Canada needs a three ocean Navy. … Continue reading A Three Ocean Navy

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting