Bad news for Canada

So, now that the motion to establish a "Trudeau Corruption Committee" has failed and, therefore, we ought not to have an election, unless Prime Minister Trudeau is more desperate than even I imagined, I can turn to two articles in Foreign Affairs that caught my eye and which I think should be of interest to … Continue reading Bad news for Canada

Those fabulous fifties?

Anyone else remember the 1950s? Norman Spector, a former federal and provincial public servant, who served at the very highest levels of government, diplomat (Ambassador to Israel), corporate "communications" (public relations) guru and author, remembers: And so do I. But I don't just remember high school dances and young love, because the 1950s were a … Continue reading Those fabulous fifties?

Is America entitled to be the leader?

Professors James Goldgeier and Bruce W Jentleson, in a provocative article in Foreign Affairs, say that despite the fact that the notion "That the United States should lead the world is often taken for granted, at least in Washington, D.C. ... [because] ... The country played that role for more than seven decades after World … Continue reading Is America entitled to be the leader?

Where are we? (5)

Matthew Fisher, who is one of Canada's (too few) journalists who writes with knowledge in insight on Defence and Foreign Policy matters, says, in an opinion piece for Global News, that "Western countries with an interest in the Far North, such as Canada, Denmark (Greenland), Norway, the United Kingdom, France and the United States, were … Continue reading Where are we? (5)

A strategy of resilience

Professor Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt University) is a moderate progressive Democrat in US terms. He has been a policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren ~ he is well to the right of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and, probably, very slightly to the left of Joe Biden. He has written a provocative article in Foreign Affairs … Continue reading A strategy of resilience

Cold War 2.0: Stepping up the pressure

I see, in an article in the Hong Kong Press Press, that the US is stepping up the pressure on Beijing by reasserting its security guarantees to Taiwan. Now, I need to make my (longstanding) position clear. Taiwan is part of China. It is Chinese by geography, by ethnicity and by political will. But the … Continue reading Cold War 2.0: Stepping up the pressure

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

How to win Cold War 2.0

Robert M Gates, who was both the United States' Director of Central Intelligence (1991-93 under President George HW Bush) and Secretary of Defence for both Presidents George W Bush and Barack Obama (2006-2011), writes in Foreign Affairs, that "Even before the virus struck, there was broad bipartisan agreement that Washington should reduce its commitments abroad … Continue reading How to win Cold War 2.0

A foreign policy choice for Canada

So, two things caught my eye last week: first, in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson quoted a room full of (mostly young and über-bright) Canadian academics, all of whom are moaning about Canada's foreign policy being off the rails; then, over in Foreign Affairs, a world-famous strategic thinker, Professor G John Ikenberry, from Princeton … Continue reading A foreign policy choice for Canada