Let them in

When the proposed $20 Billion merger of Shaw into Rogers was first announced, a few days ago, my initial reaction was: Rita Trichur, writing in the Globe and Mail, explains that: First, Rogers’ “friendly deal to acquire Shaw for $20.4-billion was inevitable. Their long-standing agreement to not compete in each other’s respective home turf (Rogers…… Continue reading Let them in

CANZUK, again.

Nigel Wright, who was Chief of Staff to Prime Minister Stephen Harper (and who resigned when it was discovered that he used his own money to repay some of Senator Mike Duffy’s misappropriated expenses) and is now the (London based) Senior Managing Director of the multi-billion dollar Onex Corporation, says, in a piece published by…… Continue reading CANZUK, again.

Good news …

… and well done to Trade Minister Mary Ng because CBC News reports that “Negotiations between Canada and the United Kingdom to hammer out the terms of their post-Brexit trade have concluded, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said in a video released to the media Saturday morning.” This is an important vital…… Continue reading Good news …

A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press’ Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that “Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden…… Continue reading A Biden Foreign Policy

Is Conservatism Dead?

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says what I suspect many are thinking: “The lacklustre race for leader of the Conservative Party of Canada is further evidence of the impossibility of conservatism in our time.” It’s not that conservatism is dead, he says, but, he explains, and I agree that “in this century,…… Continue reading Is Conservatism Dead?

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur’s idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that…… Continue reading Boring, but vital

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all … they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump’s notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from our…… Continue reading Not inconsistent

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King’s College, which is one of Canada’s oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada’s foreign policy for the CBC’s Opinion section. They look…… Continue reading Three Ps

Relationships

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, whose insights into China have caused me to comment before, writes, in an article in Foreign Affairs, that  “despite the best efforts of ideological warriors in Beijing and Washington, the uncomfortable truth is that China and the United States are both likely to emerge from this [global pandemic] crisis…… Continue reading Relationships