I don’t often disagree …

... with Norman Spector, he is a man of HUGE accomplishments, an author, diplomat and very senior public servant, who always takes a reasoned approach to situations. But this time, I must. Mr Spector said ... ... and I think he's wrong. I think Canadians should be quietly applauding today because Canada "dodged a bullet," … Continue reading I don’t often disagree …

China is a bully

"China is a bully," says Scottish journalist Stephen Daisley, writing in The Spectator, and "the sooner the West understands that, the sooner we can begin to push back." I think that much, even most of the West does understand that. The evidence has been mounting for years, starting with China's push into the contested waters … Continue reading China is a bully

Is India the answer?

There is an interesting opinion piece, by Vijay Sappini, in the Toronto Sun in which the author suggests that "As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads over the world, governments are struggling to grapple with the scale of the crisis and to get ahead of it when and where possible ... [and] ... A direct consequence of the crisis has been … Continue reading Is India the answer?

I wonder if anyone is listening

Michelle Carbert, writing in the Globe and Mail, says that "Canada’s top general [General Jonathan Vance, ⇐ the Chief of the Defence Staff] says Russia poses the most immediate military threat to this country and the international community today, while China represents a significant risk for cyber attacks ... [and, the point was echoed by … Continue reading I wonder if anyone is listening

Resetting our foreign policy

It is no secret, I think, to anyone who follows this blog that I regard Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's white paper on foreign policy, 'A Foreign Policy for Canadians,' as having been an act of policy vandalism. I continue to believe that Pierre Trudeau was driven by an intense need to find a way to … Continue reading Resetting our foreign policy

Getting the UN thing right

Mike Blanchfield, writing for the Canadian Press, says, in an article published by the National Observer, that "The ill will of autocratic countries like China, and some worthy head-on competitors, should compel the Trudeau government to campaign harder for a seat on the United Nations Security Council, analysts said Friday." Those analysts are wrong. The … Continue reading Getting the UN thing right

What we know and don’t know, for sure, so far

What we do know, for sure, is that: Qassem Soleimani is dead. That is, without a shadow of a doubt, a good thing. He was a monster and his demise makes the world an ever so slightly better place. We should not dance on anyone's grave, not even those of Hitler, Stalin, Tojo and Mao, … Continue reading What we know and don’t know, for sure, so far

What the ….?

Let's just review the situation, shall we ... First: Justin Trudeau opened a (one-sided) love affair with China, suggesting that a free(er) trade deal was imminent; Then: in late 2017 Team Trudeau was sent packing by the Chinese after it presented an ill-conceived bit of virtue signalling instead of concrete, business-like trade proposals; Next: the … Continue reading What the ….?

A bit of fallout from the UK election (1): Mary Ng

It seems to me that Canadians need to take a lot more interest in this lady ⇐ Mary Ng. Ms Ng is Justin Trudeau's newly minted Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade. (It's a bit of an upgrade for her, she was, previously, the Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion. Jim … Continue reading A bit of fallout from the UK election (1): Mary Ng

And it’s …

... Boris Johnson by a good, solid margin, according to the very early returns and exit polls. Prime Minister Johnson appears to have the solid majority (forecast to be 86 seats more than the combined opposition)* that he needs to make the Brexit happen. It's not a landslide but it is, it seems to me, … Continue reading And it’s …