The Trump Effect (5)

Mark MacKinnon, the Globe and Mail’s senior international corespondent, says, in a recent article in that newspaper, that “No matter what happens on U.S. election day, no one will ever say that Donald Trump did not leave his mark on the world during his time as President of the United States.” I had hoped that […]

Preparing for Cold War 2.0

Nadia Schadlow, who is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute and, most recently, was U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy, has penned a useful article in Foreign Affairs in which she says that “No matter who is U.S. president come January, American policymakers will need to adopt new ideas about the country’s role in the […]

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then “Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 … [and, later] …  On July 15th, […]

A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It’s a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson […]

A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press’ Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that “Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden […]

Containing Putin’s Russia

Former Assistant Secretary of State (in the previous (Obama) Administration) and former CEO of the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), Victoria “Toria” Nuland, who is also the Brady-Johnson Distinguished Practitioner in Grand Strategy at Yale University, and a Member of the Board of the National Endowment for Democracy, has penned an interesting article in Foreign […]

A foreign policy choice for Canada

So, two things caught my eye last week: first, in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson quoted a room full of (mostly young and über-bright) Canadian academics, all of whom are moaning about Canada’s foreign policy being off the rails; then, over in Foreign Affairs, a world-famous strategic thinker, Professor G John Ikenberry, from Princeton […]

Failure after failure after failure after …

… well, you get the picture. Justin Trudeau came into office in 2015 proclaiming that Canada is Back! Of course, as recent events have shown, nothing could be further from the truth. By almost every measure Canada has fallen in wealth, power and international stature since Justin Trudeau replaced Stephen Harper at the head of […]

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur’s idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that […]