Indian foreign policy: “alliances are burdensome”

There is a very interesting article on the United States Naval Institute (USNI) News website by John Grady, a veteran military and foreign affairs journalist, about changes to India's foreign policy. India's foreign policy has been complicated from the very beginning (1947) of its modern independence. India has (almost) always been a proud, more-or-less liberal … Continue reading Indian foreign policy: “alliances are burdensome”

I think this is it …

Andrew Lilico, the father of the CANZUK proposal, had it about right, I think, a few days ago. I doubt that anyone or anything can stop Britain from crashing out of the EU without any form of a formal agreement, that's what the "no-deal Brexit" means, on 31 October. It is, for 99% of British … Continue reading I think this is it …

Canada and China

Two items in the Globe and Mail caught my eye just the other day: First, Campbell Clark says that "Dominic Barton is the catch that Justin Trudeau wanted to get last time. Now he’s going to China after times have changed ... [because] ... Two Canadians are in Chinese jails, and Beijing’s official mouthpieces regularly fire derisive … Continue reading Canada and China

“Mad Dog” speaks; Canada should listen

It is no secret that I am an admirer of retired US Marine Corps General and former US Secretary of Defense James "Mad Dog" Mattis; in fact, back in April of 2016 I hoped that he would run for president of the USA to spare America from having to choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton … Continue reading “Mad Dog” speaks; Canada should listen

The plan

So, about a week ago I speculated on how British Prime Minister Boris Johnson might have a November election, even as early as 1 November, the day after the UK "crashes out" of the European Union with a "no-deal" Brexit. Almost three weeks ago I speculated on how that "no-deal" Brexit might shape Britain and … Continue reading The plan

Alternative history (2): More on the Brexit

This post is, mostly, conjecture. I remain convinced that a hard head says that the Brexit is a mistake but I am also persuaded that Britons voted, in a slight majority, with their hearts, not their heads, and I hope they were right. Lawrence Summers, a noted economist, the former president of Harvard University and … Continue reading Alternative history (2): More on the Brexit