Whither the SoCons?

Almost four years ago I suggested that there was room, on the Canadian political spectrum, for four national parties: Today’s NDP, with much better leadership, should, I suggested, be able to regularly win between 15 to 35 seats and even more, now and again;The centrist Liberal and the equally centrist Conservatives should, regularly, again, win…… Continue reading Whither the SoCons?

Let them in

When the proposed $20 Billion merger of Shaw into Rogers was first announced, a few days ago, my initial reaction was: Rita Trichur, writing in the Globe and Mail, explains that: First, Rogers’ “friendly deal to acquire Shaw for $20.4-billion was inevitable. Their long-standing agreement to not compete in each other’s respective home turf (Rogers…… Continue reading Let them in

CANZUK, again.

Nigel Wright, who was Chief of Staff to Prime Minister Stephen Harper (and who resigned when it was discovered that he used his own money to repay some of Senator Mike Duffy’s misappropriated expenses) and is now the (London based) Senior Managing Director of the multi-billion dollar Onex Corporation, says, in a piece published by…… Continue reading CANZUK, again.

Another Ooops

I see in an article by Patrick Brethour in the Globe and Mail that “Since the early days of the pandemic, the federal Liberal government has pointed to rock-bottom interest rates as a key reason why their spend-in-all-directions fiscal approach will not drive Canada into a debt wall …[and] … In the fall economic statement,…… Continue reading Another Ooops

The end of the CPC?

There are those who believe that the Conservative Party of Canada suffers from some sort of political suicide ideation. There seem to be factions in the Party that are emotionally incapable of accepting any sort of compromise or moderation. The Campaign Life Coalition might be one of them. I see, in an article in the…… Continue reading The end of the CPC?

A stab in the back?

Just as some Canadians in the commentariat are saying that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is giving our country “the worst Canadian government ever,” John Ibbitson, an astute observer, says, in the Globe and Mail, that “Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole needs to do a better job.” He’s got a long way to go, Mr Ibbitson says…… Continue reading A stab in the back?

Worrying prognostications

Tom Mulcair, a pretty savvy politician I think we can all agree, says, in an opinion piece in the Ottawa Citizen, that “Anyone who entertained doubts that Justin Trudeau is doing everything he can to clear the runway for a spring election only had to look at events of last week to understand that he’s…… Continue reading Worrying prognostications

Bad news

So, there is a new Angus Reid Institute poll out, and it has a boat load of bad news for everyone. First, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau remains mired in minority territory: Experience with Canada’s five party system, starting from 2006, says that a party needs something slightly in excess of 39% of the popular vote…… Continue reading Bad news

It is time for a change

Many decades ago, when Pierre Trudeau was prime minister, I was, for a while, a student at the Staff College where the Canadian Forces tried, with some success, to turn middle ranked officers into potential admiral and generals. We studied, amongst other things, the “national security environment.” (I think that’s how the academics, somewhat pretentiously,…… Continue reading It is time for a change