My choice

It has not exactly been an inspiring race for the leadership of the Conservative Party, but then neither was the last one. Part of the perceived problem was the global pandemic but part of it was a quite unreasonable and, in fact, unreasoned, desire to have some newsworthy "fireworks." Instead, four reasonable people debated four reasonable … Continue reading My choice

Liberalism is under attack, again

The Economist, in a cover article, headlined "The new ideology of race," says that "America's problem with racism can be divided into two parts. One contains all the myriad injustices that still blight African-American lives a century and a half after the end of slavery. The other is the way that factions on the right … Continue reading Liberalism is under attack, again

Is Conservatism Dead?

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says what I suspect many are thinking: "The lacklustre race for leader of the Conservative Party of Canada is further evidence of the impossibility of conservatism in our time." It's not that conservatism is dead, he says, but, he explains, and I agree that "in this century, … Continue reading Is Conservatism Dead?

Military reserves

For those interested, and every thinking Canadian should have some, albeit limited interest in the subject, there is an interesting thread over on Army.ca which deals with the problems (there are a lot of them) in making Canada's reserve Army (the militia if you're old enough) into an effective force. I'm going to go with … Continue reading Military reserves

Is the worst over?

European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde is a very smart person and, on Friday, according to a report by Reuters, she said that Europe "is “probably past” the worst of the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic, but the recovery will be uneven ... [and] ... Speaking as fears of a second wave shook investors … Continue reading Is the worst over?

No one gives a damn: broken systems, broken veterans

Almost two years ago the Supreme Court of Canada drove a final nail into the coffin of an attempt by wounded veterans to hold the government to a "social covenant" which, they argued, had been established during the First World War. The highest court in the land, Murray Brewster wrote (first link) "was asked to … Continue reading No one gives a damn: broken systems, broken veterans

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur's idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that … Continue reading Boring, but vital

Why does this not surprise me?

This article in the National Post just caused me (and many of my friends and former colleagues with, in total, centuries of experience in National Defence Headquarters)  to shrug. You might have looked for at least an eye-roll, but, no, all it rated was a shrug. What didn't surprise anyone? Well, according to the Canadian … Continue reading Why does this not surprise me?

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)

China is a bully

"China is a bully," says Scottish journalist Stephen Daisley, writing in The Spectator, and "the sooner the West understands that, the sooner we can begin to push back." I think that much, even most of the West does understand that. The evidence has been mounting for years, starting with China's push into the contested waters … Continue reading China is a bully