Is Canada broken?

A bit more than ten years ago, John Ibbitson asked that question in the Globe and Mail. It appeared to him, then, that “Canada is a nation of strong provinces with a weak federal government, hobbled by minority Parliaments and uncertain of its own relevance.” Not much has changed, has it? He also said thatContinue reading “Is Canada broken?”

Failing the test

The Gatestone Institute is a strongly conservative, pro-Zionist and some say anti-Muslim, American think tank founded by Nina Rosenwald and headed, for a time, by John Bolton. Ms Rosenwald comes by her Zionism honestly, she is the heiress to the Sears, Roebuck fortune and, equally, heiress to a long tradition of Rosenwald philanthropy that included,Continue reading “Failing the test”

Some BIG news

This, from MIT, the prestigious US university, might be very big news: “New research by engineers at MIT and elsewhere could lead to batteries that can pack more power per pound and last longer, based on the long-sought goal of using pure lithium metal as one of the battery’s two electrodes, the anode.“ The articleContinue reading “Some BIG news”

The Precariat squared

I have written, several times before about the precariat (which is sometimes defined as a social class formed by people suffering from precarity, which is a condition of existence without predictability or security, affecting material or psychological welfare). The main problem of the precariat is the very precariousness (hence the term) of its day-to-day andContinue reading “The Precariat squared”

More on immigration

Linda Nazareth, who is an economist and a self-described ‘futurist,’ and a regular contributor to the Globe and Mail, has written a useful opinion piece for that journal in which she follows up on some thoughts from the World Economic Forum. The world she (and they) says can be seen like this*: Most of Africa,Continue reading “More on immigration”

Will Ottawa ever do the right thing?

That’s the question the Globe and Mail‘s Robyn Urbach asked in an opinion piece last week. The issue is Québec’s Loi 21 ~ the bill that forbids public employees, like teachers and police officers from wearing a hijab or a kippah or a turban ~ it’s an act which Ms Urbach describes as being “anContinue reading “Will Ottawa ever do the right thing?”

Making Conservatism work

Andrew Coyne, writing in the Globe and Mail a few days ago, after covering ground that I have covered, over and over again, said that: “The first and most important step, then, is for Conservatives to develop some elemental self-confidence; to accept that they are in the persuasion game, and that the answer to electoralContinue reading “Making Conservatism work”

Another tangled web

This only matters because it involves Time magazine’s person of the year. A few days ago, Greta Thunberg posted this: Now, overcrowded trains are a fact of life around the world. In many countries, including Britain, China and Germany ~ where population density makes rail a cheap and efficient mode of transport ~ supply can,Continue reading “Another tangled web”

A good diagnosis and a useful prescription

Jack Mintz,  is a highly regarded economist who is the President’s Fellow at the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy and who also serves on the boards of Imperial Oil Limited and Morneau Shepell (Liberal Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s family firm) and is the National Policy Advisor for Ernst & Young. He has written anContinue reading “A good diagnosis and a useful prescription”

It’s still nonsense

The Globe and Mail says, yet again, in an editorial, that “it’s time to look at banning these sorts of guns, which are increasingly employed in violent crime in Canada’s cities, and increasingly involved in homicides … [and] … These firearms are small, portable and easily concealed. They’re also relatively inaccurate, and have few legal uses. They’reContinue reading “It’s still nonsense”