Sleeping with the elephant

It is time to return to thinking about the USA and how Canada can and should respond to what is happening there. I have been a fan of Professor Amy Chua since her first book, 'World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability' was published almost 20 years ago. … Continue reading Sleeping with the elephant

Climate apocalypse?

A  couple of days ago, I quoted the Globe and Mail's John Ibbitson who said, "in this century, conservatives have struggled to meet the challenge of climate change."  Perhaps that's because the "challenge" has been seriously overstated. Michael Shellenberger is a Time Magazine "Hero of the Environment," winner of the Green Book Award, and the … Continue reading Climate apocalypse?

Some thoughts on taxes

My first and, I believe, the most important thing to understand about taxes is: there is only one taxpayer; it is you and me and individuals like us. Corporations do not pay taxes ~ they pass every single penny of the taxes assessed to them on to us, their customers. You and I and your … Continue reading Some thoughts on taxes

Is the worst over?

European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde is a very smart person and, on Friday, according to a report by Reuters, she said that Europe "is “probably past” the worst of the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic, but the recovery will be uneven ... [and] ... Speaking as fears of a second wave shook investors … Continue reading Is the worst over?

The Argentina of the North

Almost three weeks ago, I quoted Professor Jack Mintz who said "Creditors eventually will want Canadian governments to have sustainable fiscal plans. If not, they will downgrade our debt, leading to higher interest rates. This has already happened to Alberta, which has the lowest debt-to-GDP ratio of all the provinces but also the second highest … Continue reading The Argentina of the North

Failure after failure after failure after …

... well, you get the picture. Justin Trudeau came into office in 2015 proclaiming that Canada is Back! Of course, as recent events have shown, nothing could be further from the truth. By almost every measure Canada has fallen in wealth, power and international stature since Justin Trudeau replaced Stephen Harper at the head of … Continue reading Failure after failure after failure after …

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur's idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that … Continue reading Boring, but vital

Why does this not surprise me?

This article in the National Post just caused me (and many of my friends and former colleagues with, in total, centuries of experience in National Defence Headquarters)  to shrug. You might have looked for at least an eye-roll, but, no, all it rated was a shrug. What didn't surprise anyone? Well, according to the Canadian … Continue reading Why does this not surprise me?

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all ... they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump's notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from our … Continue reading Not inconsistent

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King's College, which is one of Canada's oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada's foreign policy for the CBC's Opinion section. They look … Continue reading Three Ps