A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

“The law is clear,” but the political and policy implications are murky

There is, it seems to me, a concerted effort to bring the case of the "Two Michals," Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, two Canadians being detained in China as an act of hostage diplomacy in a larger contest between China and the US-led West, back into the public eye. This, for example, is the (online) … Continue reading “The law is clear,” but the political and policy implications are murky

Failure after failure after failure after …

... well, you get the picture. Justin Trudeau came into office in 2015 proclaiming that Canada is Back! Of course, as recent events have shown, nothing could be further from the truth. By almost every measure Canada has fallen in wealth, power and international stature since Justin Trudeau replaced Stephen Harper at the head of … Continue reading Failure after failure after failure after …

I don’t often disagree …

... with Norman Spector, he is a man of HUGE accomplishments, an author, diplomat and very senior public servant, who always takes a reasoned approach to situations. But this time, I must. Mr Spector said ... ... and I think he's wrong. I think Canadians should be quietly applauding today because Canada "dodged a bullet," … Continue reading I don’t often disagree …

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King's College, which is one of Canada's oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada's foreign policy for the CBC's Opinion section. They look … Continue reading Three Ps

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

Don’t talk, Act!

I see in The Guardian that "seven former Conservative and Labour UK foreign secretaries have come together to declare ...[that] ... Britain must take the lead in co-ordinating the international response to China’s efforts to impose draconian security laws in Hong Kong." They have written a letter to UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab suggesting that … Continue reading Don’t talk, Act!

Relationships

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, whose insights into China have caused me to comment before, writes, in an article in Foreign Affairs, that  "despite the best efforts of ideological warriors in Beijing and Washington, the uncomfortable truth is that China and the United States are both likely to emerge from this [global pandemic] crisis … Continue reading Relationships

I don’t believe …

... that Justin Trudeau is an idiot who cannot manage to sit through a briefing. There are global leaders like that, but Mr Trudau is not amongst them. He can understand the points being made by senior officials, he can discuss, rationally, the policy options presented by his political advisors. He may not be the … Continue reading I don’t believe …

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting