Is America entitled to be the leader?

Professors James Goldgeier and Bruce W Jentleson, in a provocative article in Foreign Affairs, say that despite the fact that the notion "That the United States should lead the world is often taken for granted, at least in Washington, D.C. ... [because] ... The country played that role for more than seven decades after World … Continue reading Is America entitled to be the leader?

A timely warning

The generally non-partisan Macdonald-Laurier Institute has published a new report, authored by retired CBC journalist Terry Milewski, who has tracked pro-Khalistan/Sikh separatist groups for decades, which says that Pakistan is the driving force behind the Khalistan (Sikh) separatist movement which seems to have many (too man) supporters in Canada. Mr Milewski notes that considerable pressure … Continue reading A timely warning

Preparing for Cold War 2.0

Nadia Schadlow, who is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute nd, most recently, was U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy, has penned a useful article in Foreign Affairs in which she says that "No matter who is U.S. president come January, American policymakers will need to adopt new ideas about the country’s role in the … Continue reading Preparing for Cold War 2.0

There’s not much choice

"In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age." former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. "In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for having … Continue reading There’s not much choice

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It's a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson … Continue reading A G-something?

Arrant nonsense

They're back! The same über-progressive, China appeasing, knee-jerk anti-American members of the Laurentian Elites who advised Prime Minister Trudeau to drop the extradition case against Meng Wanzhou are back with another demand: Canada, ⇐ Allan Rock and Lloyd Axworthy ⇒ say, in an opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, must tear up the Safe … Continue reading Arrant nonsense

A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press' Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that "Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden … Continue reading A Biden Foreign Policy

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

“The law is clear,” but the political and policy implications are murky

There is, it seems to me, a concerted effort to bring the case of the "Two Michals," Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, two Canadians being detained in China as an act of hostage diplomacy in a larger contest between China and the US-led West, back into the public eye. This, for example, is the (online) … Continue reading “The law is clear,” but the political and policy implications are murky