It’s time for Canada to step up

Just a few days ago British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said, in the House of Commons that ""We made clear that if China continued down this path we would introduce a new route for those with British National (Overseas) status to enter the UK, granting them limited leave to remain with the ability to live … Continue reading It’s time for Canada to step up

What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Journalist and sometimes politician Stephen Taylor, writing in the National Post, says, and I agree with him, fully, that "The existence of the Wexit movement is a national tragedy ... [because] ... The Wexit movement is the latest uproar of Canadian regional populism. Canada’s bifurcation of haves and have-nots, contented and aggrieved, elites and non-elites … Continue reading What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Is the worst over?

European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde is a very smart person and, on Friday, according to a report by Reuters, she said that Europe "is “probably past” the worst of the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic, but the recovery will be uneven ... [and] ... Speaking as fears of a second wave shook investors … Continue reading Is the worst over?

Not so surprising

Lawrence Martin, a veteran and staunchly anti-conservative columnist for the Globe and Mail writes, in that newspaper, that "Just when we thought all was going to rot in the land of the distraught, good things happen. The Supreme Court of the United States comes to the rescue, issuing two humanitarian verdicts in the space of … Continue reading Not so surprising

An important anniversary

Two hundred and five years ago the fate of the world hung in the balance. Napolean Boneparte, a master tactician but, fortunately, a deeply flawed strategist, had returned from exile, recreated his Army and was threatening to topple Europe, again, and impose his very, very illiberal rule on the continent. Happily, the Duke Of Wellington … Continue reading An important anniversary

Not so fast

The Economist, looking forward to the US November elections, says "Four months ago, Donald Trump’s odds of winning a second term had never looked better. After an easy acquittal in his impeachment trial, his approval rating had reached its highest level in three years, and was approaching the upper-40s range that delivered re-election to George W. … Continue reading Not so fast

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King's College, which is one of Canada's oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada's foreign policy for the CBC's Opinion section. They look … Continue reading Three Ps

Democracy is in peril

About 1,500 years ago, in Saxon England, the nobles of the realm, the bishops, abbots (and abbesses) and the ealdormen and thegns and others would gather, fairly regularly, in an assembly to advise and, sometimes, to constrain the king. In a very typically English manner, they hit upon the notion that the kings were not, … Continue reading Democracy is in peril

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)