Let’s get cracking

One of the most important military commitments that Canada has ~ that any country can have, actually ~ is the defence of its own homeland. Canada's homeland is vast; we are the 2nd largest country in the world in area ~ at just under 10 million square kilometres we are second only to Russia (17+ … Continue reading Let’s get cracking

Fixing our foreign policy

Yesterday I wrote about the Alliance For Multilateralism which I believe is: Harmless, at worst; and Likely off to a shaky start because it already (see link above) includes a few (which is too many) countries which are either weak democracies or hardly democratic at all. That being said, Canada belongs in it because we … Continue reading Fixing our foreign policy

A year-end thought on a vital issue

Murray Brewster, writing for CBC News, reports that "Canada's new frigates are being designed with ballistic missile defence in mind, even though successive federal governments have avoided taking part in the U.S. program ... [but, he ads] ... When they slip into the water some time in the mid-to-late 2020s, the new warships probably won't … Continue reading A year-end thought on a vital issue

Not surprising (2)

David Pugliese, writing in the Ottawa Citizen, tells us that "Canadians won’t be allowed to work on parts of the country’s new surveillance aircraft because they contain sensitive American-made equipment that can only be handled by U.S. citizens." First, this 'NOFORN' designation is fairly (and I'm told increasingly) common in the United States. Canada has … Continue reading Not surprising (2)

Blue-collar conservatism

Aereo is a British left-leaning e-zine (or maybe just a glorified blog) that has been around for just a few years. In a recent (December 2019) article written by its editor, Helen Puckrose and James A Lindsay (both of whom enjoyed a brief moment of fame a year or so ago for writing "20 fake … Continue reading Blue-collar conservatism

Why we build warships

About 10 years ago, when the national shipbuilding procurement strategy was announced, by the (Conservative) Harper government, there was much discussion about how many ships, what kind of ships and how much money ~ I seem to recall that the government of the day low-balled the costs at $35 Billion, the current Parliamentary Budget Officer … Continue reading Why we build warships

The Trump Effect (5)

As I predicted late last month, President Trump did, indeed, chastise Canada and others for being "delinquent" in meeting their (specifically NATO) defence burden-sharing promises. How he will punish the "delinquents" remains to be seen, but we might get a hint from how he is, currently, treating Japan. The Financial Times discusses the president's transactional … Continue reading The Trump Effect (5)

Where are we? (4)

I have been worrying about Canada's sovereignty over the Arctic for some years now. Now I see a report by Levon Sevunts of RCI (Radio Canada International) which says that "2019 marked a busy shipping season in the Canadian Arctic with 27 ships making a full transit through the Northwest Passage, according to statistics released … Continue reading Where are we? (4)

Trump is about to rain on Trudeau’s parade

Many in the media are saying, and I agree, that Justin Trudeau's agenda for the next couple of years is about 99.9% domestic and focused, mainly, gaining seats in on Québec and holding on, at least, in Atlantic Canada and in urban and suburban Ontario and British Columbia. The overarching aim ~ the ONLY aim … Continue reading Trump is about to rain on Trudeau’s parade