And I disagree, again

So, yesterday, I said I disagreed with the Globe and Mail's John Ibbitson about how much we should "welcome" a Biden-Harris administration in Washington. He was right to point out that, in general, Canada fares better when Republicans (Eisenhower, Reagan, Bush) are in the White House rather than Democrats (Kennedy, Johnson, Carter, Obama). Donald J … Continue reading And I disagree, again

There’s not much choice

"In just a few short months, the U.S.-Chinese relationship seems to have returned to an earlier, more primal age." former Australian prime minister and noted China watcher-scholar Kevin Rudd (who I have cited, more than once, before) writes in a thought-provoking article in Foreign Affairs. "In China, Mao Zedong is once again celebrated for having … Continue reading There’s not much choice

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

Containing Putin’s Russia

Former Assistant Secretary of State (in the previous (Obama) Administration) and former CEO of the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), Victoria "Toria" Nuland, who is also the Brady-Johnson Distinguished Practitioner in Grand Strategy at Yale University, and a Member of the Board of the National Endowment for Democracy, has penned an interesting article in Foreign … Continue reading Containing Putin’s Russia

How to win Cold War 2.0

Robert M Gates, who was both the United States' Director of Central Intelligence (1991-93 under President George HW Bush) and Secretary of Defence for both Presidents George W Bush and Barack Obama (2006-2011), writes in Foreign Affairs, that "Even before the virus struck, there was broad bipartisan agreement that Washington should reduce its commitments abroad … Continue reading How to win Cold War 2.0

A foreign policy choice for Canada

So, two things caught my eye last week: first, in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson quoted a room full of (mostly young and über-bright) Canadian academics, all of whom are moaning about Canada's foreign policy being off the rails; then, over in Foreign Affairs, a world-famous strategic thinker, Professor G John Ikenberry, from Princeton … Continue reading A foreign policy choice for Canada

Military reserves

For those interested, and every thinking Canadian should have some, albeit limited interest in the subject, there is an interesting thread over on Army.ca which deals with the problems (there are a lot of them) in making Canada's reserve Army (the militia if you're old enough) into an effective force. I'm going to go with … Continue reading Military reserves

Why does this not surprise me?

This article in the National Post just caused me (and many of my friends and former colleagues with, in total, centuries of experience in National Defence Headquarters)  to shrug. You might have looked for at least an eye-roll, but, no, all it rated was a shrug. What didn't surprise anyone? Well, according to the Canadian … Continue reading Why does this not surprise me?

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all ... they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump's notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from our … Continue reading Not inconsistent

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King's College, which is one of Canada's oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada's foreign policy for the CBC's Opinion section. They look … Continue reading Three Ps