Do Something (2)

A few weeks ago I was horrified to read about the 25 year long water problems that continue to plague the Neskantaga First Nation in North-Western Ontario ~ yes you read that right: it’s been 25 years since these Canadians have had clean, potable water! I begged the government to Do Something! and I offered […]

Cultural madness

I see, in the Globe and Mail, that Justin Trudeau and Steven Guilbeault want to further regulate the broadcasting services in Canada. Their goals seem to be, in part, a cash grab ~ online streaming services, like Netflix, are offering Canadians, for a price, what they want, while the CBC offers Canadians, thanks to a […]

Getting it exactly wrong

In my arguments that try to encourage the Conservative Party to explore the possibility of a Universal Basic Income/Guaranteed Annual Income based on Milton Friedman’s idea of a Negative Income Tax, I stress that there must be one basic principle: “people who work will always make more than people who don’t.” But, as I mentioned […]

Disappointed

I supported Erin O’Toole in his quest for the Conservative Party leadership in 2017 and again in 2020. But I share the Globe and Mail’s columnist Andrew Coyne’s disappointment at both the carefully contrived language and, worse, the sentiment that Mr O’Toole showed in caving-in, no other word for it, to Québec Premier François Legault’s […]

A strategy of resilience

Professor Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt University) is a moderate progressive Democrat in US terms. He has been a policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren ~ he is well to the right of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and, probably, very slightly to the left of Joe Biden. He has written a provocative article in Foreign Affairs […]

What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Journalist and sometimes politician Stephen Taylor, writing in the National Post, says, and I agree with him, fully, that “The existence of the Wexit movement is a national tragedy … [because] … The Wexit movement is the latest uproar of Canadian regional populism. Canada’s bifurcation of haves and have-nots, contented and aggrieved, elites and non-elites […]

Democracy is in peril

About 1,500 years ago, in Saxon England, the nobles of the realm, the bishops, abbots (and abbesses) and the ealdormen and thegns and others would gather, fairly regularly, in an assembly to advise and, sometimes, to constrain the king. In a very typically English manner, they hit upon the notion that the kings were not, […]

Not a penny more

So, I saw, a few days ago, in a report in the Globe and Mail, that “The print media need extra sources of federal funding, as well as a new deal with foreign internet companies, to survive the economic shock brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the publisher of The Globe and Mail has told […]

This …

… is pretty much the consensus forecast for the Canadian economy after we reopen for business. While this …   … is the Trudeau-Morneau response. (Source: The National Post, 14 May 2020.) And, this … … is you and me and our children and grandchildren and even great-grandchildren because, for years, Fiance Minister Bill Morneau […]

It boggles the mind

Despite my remarks, yesterday, or, at least as I warned in the last sentence, this is a highly partisan post, it’s a bit of a rant, actually, because I see in an article by Mike Blanchfield of the Canadian Press, published on National Newswatch that Canada’s man-child, trust-fund-kid, limousine-liberal prime minister, Justin Trudeau indirectly compares […]