Disappointed

I supported Erin O'Toole in his quest for the Conservative Party leadership in 2017 and again in 2020. But I share the Globe and Mail's columnist Andrew Coyne's disappointment at both the carefully contrived language and, worse, the sentiment that Mr O'Toole showed in caving-in, no other word for it, to Québec Premier François Legault's … Continue reading Disappointed

A strategy of resilience

Professor Ganesh Sitaraman (Vanderbilt University) is a moderate progressive Democrat in US terms. He has been a policy advisor to Senator Elizabeth Warren ~ he is well to the right of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and, probably, very slightly to the left of Joe Biden. He has written a provocative article in Foreign Affairs … Continue reading A strategy of resilience

What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Journalist and sometimes politician Stephen Taylor, writing in the National Post, says, and I agree with him, fully, that "The existence of the Wexit movement is a national tragedy ... [because] ... The Wexit movement is the latest uproar of Canadian regional populism. Canada’s bifurcation of haves and have-nots, contented and aggrieved, elites and non-elites … Continue reading What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Democracy is in peril

About 1,500 years ago, in Saxon England, the nobles of the realm, the bishops, abbots (and abbesses) and the ealdormen and thegns and others would gather, fairly regularly, in an assembly to advise and, sometimes, to constrain the king. In a very typically English manner, they hit upon the notion that the kings were not, … Continue reading Democracy is in peril

Not a penny more

So, I saw, a few days ago, in a report in the Globe and Mail, that "The print media need extra sources of federal funding, as well as a new deal with foreign internet companies, to survive the economic shock brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the publisher of The Globe and Mail has told … Continue reading Not a penny more

This …

... is pretty much the consensus forecast for the Canadian economy after we reopen for business. While this ...   ... is the Trudeau-Morneau response. (Source: The National Post, 14 May 2020.) And, this ... ... is you and me and our children and grandchildren and even great-grandchildren because, for years, Fiance Minister Bill Morneau … Continue reading This …

It boggles the mind

Despite my remarks, yesterday, or, at least as I warned in the last sentence, this is a highly partisan post, it's a bit of a rant, actually, because I see in an article by Mike Blanchfield of the Canadian Press, published on National Newswatch that Canada's man-child, trust-fund-kid, limousine-liberal prime minister, Justin Trudeau indirectly compares … Continue reading It boggles the mind

The Conservative problem

Andrew MacDougall, a senior public relations consultant in London (the big, British London, not London, Ontario) and a former head of PR in former prime minister Stephen Harper's PMO, has penned an important opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, that I really hope the high-foreheads in the Conservative Party's HQ all read and take … Continue reading The Conservative problem

What matters

Following on from yesterday, and as I approach my next birthday (my 80th birthday is only a couple of years away) I have had recent occasion to reexamine some of my core beliefs. First, over the last 77+ years, I have lived and worked all over the world. One thing I learned is that ALL … Continue reading What matters

Self-sufficiency

The National Post, in an editorial-like, unsigned, "National Post View" says that "The global pandemic is forcing Canadians to consider, for the first time in generations, how precarious our standard of living has become. International trade has contributed greatly to our prosperity. Canadian resources, innovations and services are valued the world over — when it … Continue reading Self-sufficiency