The Trump Effect (5)

Mark MacKinnon, the Globe and Mail's senior international corespondent, says, in a recent article in that newspaper, that "No matter what happens on U.S. election day, no one will ever say that Donald Trump did not leave his mark on the world during his time as President of the United States." I had hoped that … Continue reading The Trump Effect (5)

Preparing for Cold War 2.0

Nadia Schadlow, who is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute and, most recently, was U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy, has penned a useful article in Foreign Affairs in which she says that "No matter who is U.S. president come January, American policymakers will need to adopt new ideas about the country’s role in the … Continue reading Preparing for Cold War 2.0

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

A G-something?

I said, almost two years ago, that leaders should be considering some sort of a Committee to Save the World. It's a fairly popular idea in many academic circles, in several think tanks, and in a few governments. Now I see, in a very recent article in Foreign Affairs,  that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson … Continue reading A G-something?

Containing Putin’s Russia

Former Assistant Secretary of State (in the previous (Obama) Administration) and former CEO of the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), Victoria "Toria" Nuland, who is also the Brady-Johnson Distinguished Practitioner in Grand Strategy at Yale University, and a Member of the Board of the National Endowment for Democracy, has penned an interesting article in Foreign … Continue reading Containing Putin’s Russia

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all ... they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump's notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from our … Continue reading Not inconsistent

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

Justin Trudeau does the right thing

I see, on BNN Bloomberg, that "Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has rejected Donald Trump's latest proposal to readmit Russia to the G7, stoking old divisions between the American president and the rest of the group ... [and] ... Trump was to host the G7 summit later this month but postponed it to the fall because of … Continue reading Justin Trudeau does the right thing

Relationships

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, whose insights into China have caused me to comment before, writes, in an article in Foreign Affairs, that  "despite the best efforts of ideological warriors in Beijing and Washington, the uncomfortable truth is that China and the United States are both likely to emerge from this [global pandemic] crisis … Continue reading Relationships