A lesson to be relearned, again

There is an interesting opinion piece in the United States Naval Institute's Blog by someone posting under the pseudonym of CDR Salamander.* The issue, as reported by the Associated Press, is that "Britain announced plans Monday to develop and deploy a Europe-led “maritime protection mission” to safeguard shipping in the vital Strait of Hormuz in … Continue reading A lesson to be relearned, again

Middle power?

Professor Roland Paris, of the University of Ottawa, who was formerly the foreign policy advisor to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and who has written a lot about Canada in the world, was interviewed, recently, on Australia's ABC Radio. It's a nearly one-hour-long piece, Professor Paris is on for about 10 minutes, at the beginning, and … Continue reading Middle power?

War in the “grey zone”

I said, about 18 months ago, that "Western leaders like Presidents Marcon and Trump, Chancellor Merkel and Prime Ministers Abe, May, Rutte, Trudeau, Turnbull all see “war” as a binary choice ~ you’re either fighting or you’re not, while Putin and Xi see it as spectrum wherein actual armed conflict is only one of many, … Continue reading War in the “grey zone”

Two issues

John Ibbitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, touches on a couple of issues that always concern me: restoring correct relations, including free(er) trade with China and immigration policy, and he revisits his thesis, in his recent book (with Darell Bricker), Empty Planet, which says that global populations are declining, even collapsing, in China's case. "Canada’s … Continue reading Two issues

The “unipolar moment,” “gratification without commitment” and the end of an “empire of ideas.”

A few weeks ago, Fareed Zakaria, writing in Foreign Affairs, said "Sometime in the last two years, American hegemony died. The age of U.S. dominance was a brief, heady era, about three decades marked by two moments, each a breakdown of sorts. It was born amid the collapse of the Berlin Wall, in 1989. The end, … Continue reading The “unipolar moment,” “gratification without commitment” and the end of an “empire of ideas.”

Saving the liberal world order: what middle powers might be able to do …

I said, yesterday, that Canada should be doing what it can, hopefully even playing a leading role in restraining Cold War 2.0, which is both unnecessary and, in my opinion, ill-conceived. Professor Roland Paris, of the University of Ottawa, a political scientist and former foreign policy advisor to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has written a … Continue reading Saving the liberal world order: what middle powers might be able to do …

Cold War 2.0 (2)

A few days ago I quoted Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong of Singapore who, in his opening address to the Shangri-la 2019 Dialogue,* which is (self) described by the International Institute of Strategic Studies as “Asia's premier defence summit … [which] … has built confidence and fostered practical security cooperation, by facilitating easy communication and … Continue reading Cold War 2.0 (2)