It is time (4)

I’m going to the bottom of the list I posted a few days ago to deal with “Foreign and defence policy and the compelling need ~ see What Canada needs from a couple of day ago ~ to face a dangerous world with confidence, including, especially how to deal with China, Iran, North Korea and Russia, but …

Doing the right thing

This article, in the Hindustan Times and this in the South China Morning Post, both deal with the same issue: China is trying to wear down Japan’s ability to assert sovereignty over the disputed Senkaku (尖閣諸島 in Japanese) or Diaoyutai (or Diaoyu Islands (釣魚臺列嶼 in Chinese) which are, in reality, little more than a few (eight) …

Can the liberal-internationalist order be saved?

Welcome to 2021! I hope all my readers had a happy and safe New Year celebration. I have commented, since this blog began, about liberalism, itself, and, just days ago, my fears for it in Justin Trudeau’s Canada. That brings me to an article, by the renowned American political scientist Walter Russell Mead in Foreign …

Getting it right

A few days ago I said that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had gotten things wrong, again, regarding India. Now I see, in an article in the South China Morning Post, that the British Prime Minister has gotten things right. The article says that “British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has invited India, South Korea and Australia …

Being prepared

Professor Jean-Christophe Boucher a foreign and defence policy expert at the University of Calgary has released some poll results about how Canadians feel about military missions. I do no find the overall results shocking … … because I remain convinced that most Canadians neither know nor care much about either foreign or defence policy. They, …

The Gretzky version

Professor Peter Harris (University of Colorado) suggests, in an article in Business Insider, that President-elect Biden will find it difficult, likely impossible to achieve anything like bipartisan support for his foreign policy. Even many Democrats, Professor Harris, says will not accept Biden’s views. Instead, he argues, President-elect Biden should borrow “from Wayne Gretzky, he should …

Cold War 2.0 (Biden)

Like it or not we have Cold War 2.0 and few things will matter more in the fist half of the 2020s than how President-elect Joe Biden manages the US-led West’s relationship with (against) China. The Economist, in its recent “lead” article says that “The achievement of the Trump administration was to recognise the authoritarian threat …

America’s strategic challenge in the 2020s

Winnefield Professor Graham Allison of Harvard, former CIA Deputy Director Michael J Morrell and retired Admiral James A Winnefield, a former Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and a former Commander of NORAD (which means he knows Canada’s defence situation), have written a very thoughtful analysis of America’s strategic situation in Foreign Affairs …

It’s only question of when

Jacinda Arden in New Zealand, Blaine Higgs in New Brunswick, John Horgan in British Columbia and Scott More in Saskatchewan … … have all turned minority governments into majorities or, in Premier Moe’s case, been reelected with another majority. How long can it be before Team Trudeau decides that it can do the same? What’s …

The Trump Effect (5)

Mark MacKinnon, the Globe and Mail’s senior international corespondent, says, in a recent article in that newspaper, that “No matter what happens on U.S. election day, no one will ever say that Donald Trump did not leave his mark on the world during his time as President of the United States.” I had hoped that …