Whither the SoCons?

Almost four years ago I suggested that there was room, on the Canadian political spectrum, for four national parties: Today’s NDP, with much better leadership, should, I suggested, be able to regularly win between 15 to 35 seats and even more, now and again; The centrist Liberal and the equally centrist Conservatives should, regularly, again,Continue reading “Whither the SoCons?”

Let them in

When the proposed $20 Billion merger of Shaw into Rogers was first announced, a few days ago, my initial reaction was: Rita Trichur, writing in the Globe and Mail, explains that: First, Rogers’ “friendly deal to acquire Shaw for $20.4-billion was inevitable. Their long-standing agreement to not compete in each other’s respective home turf (RogersContinue reading “Let them in”

This looks about right

David Parkins, drawing in the Globe and Mail, seems to see the current situation very clearly: Reconciling the Conservative Party‘s commitment to listen to Canadians (Policy 161 ~ which I discussed yesterday) with the realities of winning election by NOT alienating voters is hard.

The end of the CPC?

There are those who believe that the Conservative Party of Canada suffers from some sort of political suicide ideation. There seem to be factions in the Party that are emotionally incapable of accepting any sort of compromise or moderation. The Campaign Life Coalition might be one of them. I see, in an article in theContinue reading “The end of the CPC?”

A stab in the back?

Just as some Canadians in the commentariat are saying that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is giving our country “the worst Canadian government ever,” John Ibbitson, an astute observer, says, in the Globe and Mail, that “Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole needs to do a better job.” He’s got a long way to go, Mr Ibbitson saysContinue reading “A stab in the back?”

It’s simple

In a recent column in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson writes that “Our immigration system is geared to attracting high-skilled workers in the professions and trades. But our economy also depends on people whose work we undervalue, and they too should be welcomed to Canada as permanent residents … [because as Usha George, directorContinue reading “It’s simple”

Bad news

So, there is a new Angus Reid Institute poll out, and it has a boat load of bad news for everyone. First, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau remains mired in minority territory: Experience with Canada’s five party system, starting from 2006, says that a party needs something slightly in excess of 39% of the popular voteContinue reading “Bad news”

Remember CD Howe?

Not many people, unless you’re my age or older, remember when CD Howe was in the news almost every day, even on the cover of Time magazine. Canada was on the move, Canada had emerged from the Second World War and from Korea as a leading middle power and we were growing by leaps andContinue reading “Remember CD Howe?”

I am hopeful …

… that Erin O’Tool’s recent shuffle of his shadow cabinet which sees Pierre Poilievre moved to be the critic for Jobs and Industry a “portfolio” which does not exist in the Trudeau cabinet signals two things: A laser-like focus on working and middle-class Canadians ~ the ones, especially, in the suburbs and smaller communities inContinue reading “I am hopeful …”

Going green

Following on from yesterday, I see that General Motors “has announced that the majority of the vehicles it produces will be electric by 2035, and the entire company will be carbon neutral by 2040 … [and] … By the end of 2025, 40% of GM’s U.S. models will be battery electric vehicles. The company plansContinue reading “Going green”