Sleeping with the elephant

It is time to return to thinking about the USA and how Canada can and should respond to what is happening there. I have been a fan of Professor Amy Chua since her first book, 'World on Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability' was published almost 20 years ago. … Continue reading Sleeping with the elephant

Is Conservatism Dead?

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says what I suspect many are thinking: "The lacklustre race for leader of the Conservative Party of Canada is further evidence of the impossibility of conservatism in our time." It's not that conservatism is dead, he says, but, he explains, and I agree that "in this century, … Continue reading Is Conservatism Dead?

Some thoughts on taxes

My first and, I believe, the most important thing to understand about taxes is: there is only one taxpayer; it is you and me and individuals like us. Corporations do not pay taxes ~ they pass every single penny of the taxes assessed to them on to us, their customers. You and I and your … Continue reading Some thoughts on taxes

Military reserves

For those interested, and every thinking Canadian should have some, albeit limited interest in the subject, there is an interesting thread over on Army.ca which deals with the problems (there are a lot of them) in making Canada's reserve Army (the militia if you're old enough) into an effective force. I'm going to go with … Continue reading Military reserves

Why does this not surprise me?

This article in the National Post just caused me (and many of my friends and former colleagues with, in total, centuries of experience in National Defence Headquarters)  to shrug. You might have looked for at least an eye-roll, but, no, all it rated was a shrug. What didn't surprise anyone? Well, according to the Canadian … Continue reading Why does this not surprise me?

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all ... they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump's notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from our … Continue reading Not inconsistent

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

This …

... is pretty much the consensus forecast for the Canadian economy after we reopen for business. While this ...   ... is the Trudeau-Morneau response. (Source: The National Post, 14 May 2020.) And, this ... ... is you and me and our children and grandchildren and even great-grandchildren because, for years, Fiance Minister Bill Morneau … Continue reading This …

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting