A Biden Foreign Policy

There is an interesting, somewhat provocative, even hopeful article by Matthew Lee and Will Weissert of the Associated Press' Washington bureau which is published in the Globe and Mail; it says that "Should former Vice-President Joe Biden win the White House in November, America will likely be in for a foreign policy about-face as Biden … Continue reading A Biden Foreign Policy

A foreign policy choice for Canada

So, two things caught my eye last week: first, in the Globe and Mail, John Ibbitson quoted a room full of (mostly young and über-bright) Canadian academics, all of whom are moaning about Canada's foreign policy being off the rails; then, over in Foreign Affairs, a world-famous strategic thinker, Professor G John Ikenberry, from Princeton … Continue reading A foreign policy choice for Canada

The real threat to world peace

Gideon Rachman, writing in the Financial Times, says that "The Sino-Soviet split was a critical moment in the cold war. A Sino-Indian split could be just as crucial to the “second cold war” that seems to be developing between the US and China. Until now, the Indian government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has … Continue reading The real threat to world peace

It’s time for Canada to step up

Just a few days ago British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said, in the House of Commons that ""We made clear that if China continued down this path we would introduce a new route for those with British National (Overseas) status to enter the UK, granting them limited leave to remain with the ability to live … Continue reading It’s time for Canada to step up

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

“The law is clear,” but the political and policy implications are murky

There is, it seems to me, a concerted effort to bring the case of the "Two Michals," Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, two Canadians being detained in China as an act of hostage diplomacy in a larger contest between China and the US-led West, back into the public eye. This, for example, is the (online) … Continue reading “The law is clear,” but the political and policy implications are murky

Failure after failure after failure after …

... well, you get the picture. Justin Trudeau came into office in 2015 proclaiming that Canada is Back! Of course, as recent events have shown, nothing could be further from the truth. By almost every measure Canada has fallen in wealth, power and international stature since Justin Trudeau replaced Stephen Harper at the head of … Continue reading Failure after failure after failure after …

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all ... they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump's notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from our … Continue reading Not inconsistent

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King's College, which is one of Canada's oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada's foreign policy for the CBC's Opinion section. They look … Continue reading Three Ps

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …