A sensible environmental plan

This story, from the Globe and Mail, is over a year old but the headline still shocks me: One trillion litres of sewage leaked into lakes and rivers over last five years That’s right, one trillion litres. That’s 1,000,000,000,000 litres. That’s about the same as 400,000 official Olympic-sized swimming pools full of stinking raw sewage. StatsCanContinue reading “A sensible environmental plan”

Think globally, act locally

Rita Trichur is a senior business writer and columnist at the Globe and Mail. She has written an interesting opinion piece for the Globe and Mail about Canada, India and energy. Ms Trichur reminds us that despite all the hoopla about Prime Minister Trudeau playing ‘Mr Dressup‘ in India on February 2018, there was aContinue reading “Think globally, act locally”

It needs repeating

A few days ago, I said, regarding both energy and environmental/clime change policies, that: “The very clear and obvious better choice is to build pipelines so that all Canadians can use Canadian oil, gas and natural gas, to fuel their cars and heat their homes rather than having tankers bring Arab and Iranian oil intoContinue reading “It needs repeating”

A good diagnosis and a useful prescription

Jack Mintz,  is a highly regarded economist who is the President’s Fellow at the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy and who also serves on the boards of Imperial Oil Limited and Morneau Shepell (Liberal Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s family firm) and is the National Policy Advisor for Ernst & Young. He has written anContinue reading “A good diagnosis and a useful prescription”

Going green rather than going broke

Author and educator Dan Gardner says, in the Globe and Mail, that “One in three Canadians thinks nuclear power emits as much carbon dioxide as burning oil. Almost three in 10 think it emits more … [and, he says] … There are several reasons to marvel at these facts, which were uncovered by Abacus Data earlier this year.Continue reading “Going green rather than going broke”

Et tu Freeland?

Back in the autumn of 2018, Gerry Nichols, writing in the Hill TImes, opined that the 2023 election would be more interesting than the 2019 version because, by then, Chrystia Freeland would be leading the Liberal Party. In January of this year, before the Philpott/SNC-Lavalin/Wilson-Raybould crisis, an opinion piece in Carleton University‘s weekly newspaper notedContinue reading “Et tu Freeland?”

Climate change and human nature

There is a very useful article in The Economist which says that people all over the world, but especially in the USA, are starting to comprehend that climate change is real. But, the article says, and it’s a big BUT, “amid the clamour is a single, jarring truth. Demand for oil is rising and theContinue reading “Climate change and human nature”

Cabinet making

A friend and regular interlocutor, reacting to a comment I made about a week ago, suggesting that the Trudeau cabinet is still too large, challenged me to look at the “ideal” cabinet. Now, it is certainly no secret that I think the “best” government Canada ever had, in modern times, say during the past century,Continue reading “Cabinet making”

So, there’s a cabinet shuffle coming up tomorrow …

… and here is some unsolicited (and possibly even unwelcome) advice for the Liberal Party’s grownups (and there are still some) who may yet have a bit of influence on Team Trudeau. It is based on my current guesstimate that the Liberals can be re-elected with a (probably weak) minority in 2019 but will be, almostContinue reading “So, there’s a cabinet shuffle coming up tomorrow …”

And a little bit more common sense

Lorrie Goldstein, writing in the Toronto Sun, adds a bit of common sense to the climate change debate. The issue isn’t about climate change, per se, or greenhouse gasses or anything like that; the issue that he illuminates is how stupidly and dishonestly Canadian politicians and the media talk about the subject. His key take-awayContinue reading “And a little bit more common sense”