Liberalism is under attack, again

The Economist, in a cover article, headlined "The new ideology of race," says that "America's problem with racism can be divided into two parts. One contains all the myriad injustices that still blight African-American lives a century and a half after the end of slavery. The other is the way that factions on the right … Continue reading Liberalism is under attack, again

Is Conservatism Dead?

John Ibitson, writing in the Globe and Mail, says what I suspect many are thinking: "The lacklustre race for leader of the Conservative Party of Canada is further evidence of the impossibility of conservatism in our time." It's not that conservatism is dead, he says, but, he explains, and I agree that "in this century, … Continue reading Is Conservatism Dead?

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur's idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that … Continue reading Boring, but vital

Building a better nationalism (2)

About a year ago, at the end of a review of someone else's ideas about nationalism, I said, "I believe that, in about 1950, Canada developed a healthy nationalism, but it didn’t survive into the 1970s. It was replaced by an unreasonable dream of a socialist nirvana in which Canadians could live off the fat of the land while … Continue reading Building a better nationalism (2)

This …

... is pretty much the consensus forecast for the Canadian economy after we reopen for business. While this ...   ... is the Trudeau-Morneau response. (Source: The National Post, 14 May 2020.) And, this ... ... is you and me and our children and grandchildren and even great-grandchildren because, for years, Fiance Minister Bill Morneau … Continue reading This …

Just a (provincial) thought

A week and a bit ago I speculated a bit about what I think might be the "new normal" as we reopen our economy after the novel-coronavirus pandemic. I suggested "the alcohol retail business will also change. If people can get a new computer or a pair fo shoes online, delivered to their door in … Continue reading Just a (provincial) thought

The right thing to do?

John Ibbitson, who is described as "a writer-at-large" for the Globe and Mail (I think that means senior columnist who is given carte balance on topics) and David Parkinson, who is the Good Grey Globe's economics columnist have, in an opinion piece, opened the pandora's box of a universal basic income. Bravo! And medals for … Continue reading The right thing to do?

Doing the right thing, doing that thing right

It's only a small programme, only a few million dollars, but the Government of Ontario's Connecting Links programme is the right thing to do, pandemic or not, and it's being done in the right way: the (relatively rich) province is helping some (relatively poorer) municipalities (not including the big cities of Hamilton, Ottawa and Toronto) … Continue reading Doing the right thing, doing that thing right

The Conservative problem

Andrew MacDougall, a senior public relations consultant in London (the big, British London, not London, Ontario) and a former head of PR in former prime minister Stephen Harper's PMO, has penned an important opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, that I really hope the high-foreheads in the Conservative Party's HQ all read and take … Continue reading The Conservative problem

Justin Trudeau has ceded the right to govern

Derek Burney, who, over a long and distinguished career, has been a diplomat, political strategist, business executive and teacher, too, writes, in the National Post, that "It is times like this when Lucien Bouchard’s claim that “Canada is not a real country” has an eerie ring of truth. Protesters of many stripes have the upper … Continue reading Justin Trudeau has ceded the right to govern