In the national interest

David Pugliese, one of only a tiny handful of Canadian journalists who writes knowledgeably about defence issues says, in a recent item in the Ottawa Citizen, that "the new CDS [Chief of the Defence Staff ~ the officer who replace retiring General Jon Vance] is expected to face the challenge of dealing with significant budget … Continue reading In the national interest

Cold War 2.0: Stepping up the pressure

I see, in an article in the Hong Kong Press Press, that the US is stepping up the pressure on Beijing by reasserting its security guarantees to Taiwan. Now, I need to make my (longstanding) position clear. Taiwan is part of China. It is Chinese by geography, by ethnicity and by political will. But the … Continue reading Cold War 2.0: Stepping up the pressure

Preparing for Cold War 2.0

Nadia Schadlow, who is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute nd, most recently, was U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy, has penned a useful article in Foreign Affairs in which she says that "No matter who is U.S. president come January, American policymakers will need to adopt new ideas about the country’s role in the … Continue reading Preparing for Cold War 2.0

I disagree

I often cite the Globe and Mail's John Ibbitson; most often I cite him approvingly. Not today; and not tomorrow, either. Today's disagreement is with his contention that Canada will and should welcome a Democratic administration in Washington (presumptively a Biden-Harris administration). Historically Canada, as John Ibbitson says, almost never likes Democratic Party governments or … Continue reading I disagree

Pushing the boundaries

I see in an article in The Economist that Russia is, once again, pushing the boundaries of internationally acceptable strategic conduct. The issue is that on 25 November 2019 Russia launched a satellite, Kosmos 2542. Then "Eleven days after its launch it disgorged another satellite, labelled Kosmos 2543 ... [and, later] ...  On July 15th, … Continue reading Pushing the boundaries

A new front in Cold War 2.0

I remarked, albeit only in passing, on the media's role in the campaign to persuade Canada that it should do a prisoner exchange: Meng Wanzhou for the “Two Michals,” Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. My comment was that the Globe and Mail's front page was devoted ~ item after item ~ to that issue. It … Continue reading A new front in Cold War 2.0

“The law is clear,” but the political and policy implications are murky

There is, it seems to me, a concerted effort to bring the case of the "Two Michals," Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, two Canadians being detained in China as an act of hostage diplomacy in a larger contest between China and the US-led West, back into the public eye. This, for example, is the (online) … Continue reading “The law is clear,” but the political and policy implications are murky

Failure after failure after failure after …

... well, you get the picture. Justin Trudeau came into office in 2015 proclaiming that Canada is Back! Of course, as recent events have shown, nothing could be further from the truth. By almost every measure Canada has fallen in wealth, power and international stature since Justin Trudeau replaced Stephen Harper at the head of … Continue reading Failure after failure after failure after …

Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur's idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that … Continue reading Boring, but vital

Not so fast

The Economist, looking forward to the US November elections, says "Four months ago, Donald Trump’s odds of winning a second term had never looked better. After an easy acquittal in his impeachment trial, his approval rating had reached its highest level in three years, and was approaching the upper-40s range that delivered re-election to George W. … Continue reading Not so fast