Boring, but vital

There are few things more boring than discussions of tax reform. Once a year, or so, most of us grumble about how complicated the tax system is ~ I have commented on Rita Trichur's idea about that, by the way ~ but then we forget it. Jack Mintz, writing in the Financial Post, says that … Continue reading Boring, but vital

Not inconsistent

I wrote, just yesterday, that, in my opinion, real Conservatives are free traders. Protectionists like Donald Trump, are not conservatives, at all ... they are horses of other colours entirely. But earlier I wrote, somewhat approvingly, of President Trump's notion of America being self-sufficient. His views, I suggested, marked a fundamental shift away from our … Continue reading Not inconsistent

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King's College, which is one of Canada's oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada's foreign policy for the CBC's Opinion section. They look … Continue reading Three Ps

The answer is …

The Economist asks an important question: "Can Hong Kong remain a conduit between China and the world?" The short answer is: No. As The Economist says, "Hong Kong’s place in the world depends on having the rule of law, a trusted reputation and seamless access to Western financial markets." The "rule of law" is dying … Continue reading The answer is …

Relationships

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, whose insights into China have caused me to comment before, writes, in an article in Foreign Affairs, that  "despite the best efforts of ideological warriors in Beijing and Washington, the uncomfortable truth is that China and the United States are both likely to emerge from this [global pandemic] crisis … Continue reading Relationships

One old person’s thoughts about caring for old people

I'm not shocked at what military medics found in some long term care facilities. Saddened, but not shocked. Anecdote: I was in a conversation, a few years ago, about PTSD. One fellow said something that stuck with me. 'It wasn't,' he said, 'the fighting or the killing that got to me. My training prepared me … Continue reading One old person’s thoughts about caring for old people

Not a penny more

So, I saw, a few days ago, in a report in the Globe and Mail, that "The print media need extra sources of federal funding, as well as a new deal with foreign internet companies, to survive the economic shock brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the publisher of The Globe and Mail has told … Continue reading Not a penny more

This …

... is pretty much the consensus forecast for the Canadian economy after we reopen for business. While this ...   ... is the Trudeau-Morneau response. (Source: The National Post, 14 May 2020.) And, this ... ... is you and me and our children and grandchildren and even great-grandchildren because, for years, Fiance Minister Bill Morneau … Continue reading This …

I don’t believe …

... that Justin Trudeau is an idiot who cannot manage to sit through a briefing. There are global leaders like that, but Mr Trudau is not amongst them. He can understand the points being made by senior officials, he can discuss, rationally, the policy options presented by his political advisors. He may not be the … Continue reading I don’t believe …

Doing the heavy lifting

Yesterday, I talked about standing up to China, the bully and restoring confidence in Canada. Today, I want to discuss how to do that. It's a bit disjointed, I'm afraid, because there are a lot of things wrong and fixing just one or two will not be enough. I said that Prime. Minister Justin Trudeau … Continue reading Doing the heavy lifting