What’s wrong with Wexit? Everything*

Journalist and sometimes politician Stephen Taylor, writing in the National Post, says, and I agree with him, fully, that “The existence of the Wexit movement is a national tragedy … [because] … The Wexit movement is the latest uproar of Canadian regional populism. Canada’s bifurcation of haves and have-nots, contented and aggrieved, elites and non-elites […]

Three Ps

John Kirk, who is a professor of Latin American studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and Stephen Kimber, a professor of journalism at the University of King’s College, which is one of Canada’s oldest universities (founded in 1789), have written a fairly tame critique of Canada’s foreign policy for the CBC’s Opinion section. They look […]

It boggles the mind

Despite my remarks, yesterday, or, at least as I warned in the last sentence, this is a highly partisan post, it’s a bit of a rant, actually, because I see in an article by Mike Blanchfield of the Canadian Press, published on National Newswatch that Canada’s man-child, trust-fund-kid, limousine-liberal prime minister, Justin Trudeau indirectly compares […]

Doing the right thing, doing that thing right

It’s only a small programme, only a few million dollars, but the Government of Ontario’s Connecting Links programme is the right thing to do, pandemic or not, and it’s being done in the right way: the (relatively rich) province is helping some (relatively poorer) municipalities (not including the big cities of Hamilton, Ottawa and Toronto) […]

What are we for?

Todd Purdom, who is an editor and political correspondent for Vanity Fair, reminded us, a dozen years ago, that the Rogers and Hammerstein musical ‘South Pacific’ had, then, some lessons for us. He reminded us, specifically, of the scene in which the American officers are trying to persuade the civilian planter, Emile De Becque to […]

How bilingual? (2)

Rosemary Barton, CBC News’ newly-minted Chief Political Correspondent visits my issue of “How bilingual?” in an Analysis (in reality and opinion piece) which could, pretty clearly, have been written by any recent Liberal prime minister’s Director of Communications. (Maybe she’s looking for a new job given that Kate Purchase jumped ship in late December and […]

How bilingual?

There is a provocative opinion piece in the Globe and Mail, by journalist, author and publisher Kenneth Whyte, who is, also, Chair of the Board of the (fairly conservative) Donner Canadian Foundation, which did not, I think, get sufficient attention. In it, he says that it’s time the Conservative Party reconsidered its unstated but very […]

Making Conservatism work

Andrew Coyne, writing in the Globe and Mail a few days ago, after covering ground that I have covered, over and over again, said that: “The first and most important step, then, is for Conservatives to develop some elemental self-confidence; to accept that they are in the persuasion game, and that the answer to electoral […]

Wexit?

So, two things caught my eye: First, a several-month-old article in ‘American Thinker’ ~ which I regard as a pretty ‘hard-right’ news source ~ which deals, I think, reasonably fairly with the underlying issues behind the Wester/Alberta separatist movement; and Second, a very recent article on the BBC News website headlined: “Wexit: Why some Albertans […]